home > paid book/ebook

Where the Wild Things Are

Customer Reviews:

Inside The Mind Of A Child

By Lisa Forrest - November 30, 1999

My mother first bought this book for my oldest son. It has endured as a beloved favorite to all three of my boys. I think that children can really identify with Max and his thoughts. When he is sent to his room for misbehavior, his imagination helps him to run away to where the wild things are and collect his thoughts. I believe that the author must remember what its like to be a child and feel like no one understands, and not quite understanding yourself. Ruling the wild things helps Max understand that he just wants to feel loved, and helps parents to keep in mind that such outbursts from children are generally cries for attention--for someone to love them best of all. Mr. Sendak understands children! When you read this book it will transport you back to your own childhood and you will remember that lost feeling of being a child. Bravo, Maurice! You are my hero!

Use coupon below to get discount at eCampus.com!

SHADES
$3 off textbook orders over $75

SUNBLOCK
$4 off textbook orders over $90

SUNSHINE
$5 off textbook orders over $100

Copy the coupon code before clicking the button!

AVAILABILITY
MerchantFormatPrice
Amazon USPaperback$0.43 - $18.95
BookBytePaperback$13.46
eCampusPaperback$12.34 discount!
PREVIEW
Related Documents
Where the Wild Things Were : Life, Death, and Ecological Wreckage in a Land of Vanishing Predators

Where the Wild Things Were : Life, Death, and Ecological Wreckage in a Land of Vanishing Predators

$4.99

Where the Wild Things Were : Life, Death, and Ecological Wreckage in a Land of Vanishing Predators

Where the Wild Things Were : Life, Death, and Ecological Wreckage in a Land of Vanishing Predators

Where the Wild Things Were : Life, Death, and Ecological Wreckage in a Land of Vanishing Predators

$8.95 - $16.00

“Big, fierce animals have a noble champion in William Stolzenburg.”—Edward O. Wilson, Professor Emeritus, Harvard University Wildlife journalist William Stolzenburg ...

The House Where the Hardest Things Happened

The House Where the Hardest Things Happened

$12.99

Fusing an intimate memoir with an outspoken critique of organized religion's failure to welcome all into its community, The House Where the Hardest Things Happened is the moving story of one ...

Sammy Keyes and the Wild Things

Sammy Keyes and the Wild Things

$3.06 - $7.99

THIS IS NOT the summer camping trip of Sammy’s dreams. She imagined shade, streams, a deer or two. But she winds up in a phony forest with scrubby shrubs, blazing sun, rattlesnakes, and ...

Wild Things: The Art of Nurturing Boys

Wild Things: The Art of Nurturing Boys

$5.92 - $14.99

Playing off the themes in the Caldecott Medal-winning children's book Where the Wild Things Are, this informative, practical, and encouraging guide will help parents guide boys down the path ...

The Way Things Are

The Way Things Are

$9.16 - $29.95

Where can we find what is ultimately meaningful? How can we discover what is truly worth knowing? In one form or another Huston Smith has been posing these questions to himself--and the world--all ...

A Thousand Names for Joy: Living in Harmony with the Way Things Are

A Thousand Names for Joy: Living in Harmony with the Way Things Are

$3.66 - $15.00

“Byron Katie is one of the truly great and inspiring teachers of our time. I encourage everyone to immerse themselves in this phenomenal book.” –Dr. Wayne W. DyerIn her ...

The Way Things Are: A Living Approach to Buddhism (Buddhism (O Books))

The Way Things Are: A Living Approach to Buddhism (Buddhism (O Books))

$2.38 - $19.95

This seminal work offers the liberating and powerful methods of Diamond Way Buddhism for readers seeking to incorporate Buddhist practice into their daily lives.

The Way Things Are: The De Rerum Natura of Titus Lucretius Carus

The Way Things Are: The De Rerum Natura of Titus Lucretius Carus

$0.01 - $15.00

"... [captures] the relentless urgency of Lucretius’ didacticism, his passionate conviction and proselytizing fervour.’ —The Classical Review

loading