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Communication Process

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Communication is the process of sharing our ideas, thoughts, and feelings with other people and having those ideas, thoughts, and feelings understood by the people we are talking with. When we communicate we speak, listen, and observe.
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Showing 3 comments

by us on March 16th, 2011 at 08:45 am
not much enough
by simo on February 09th, 2012 at 11:38 am
salut
by simo on February 09th, 2012 at 11:41 am
tres interessant
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Content Preview
Welcome and Introductions
Lesson 7
Communication
Process
Overview: This lesson teaches learners to define the elements of effective
communication and its process. It will focus on communication as the
Time: 1 hour
best way to convey meaning and introduce barriers to the communica-
tion process. Students will learn the communication process loop and its
Teaching Materials:
key elements.
— Communication Loop Visual
— White Board
Educational Goal: The goal of this lesson is for each learner to:
— Note Taker for Students
(1) Comprehend the elements of the communication process and
— EFF Skill Standards – Speak
(2) respond positively to it and how it applies to their goals and lives.
So Others Can Understand,
Listen Actively, and Observe
Objectives:
Critically
Cognitive: — Define effective communication
— Explain the elements of the communication process, the
Student Materials:
best communication approach (transaction), and
— Learner Note Taker
internal and external barriers.
Affective:
— Describe the value of effective communication and its
various elements.
Skills Connection: How it relates: Learners must talk with respect, listen
for understanding, get along with others, and speak so others can under-
stand in order to use the Communication Process effectively as it applies
to their life and goals as parents, workers, and citizens. This lesson has
connections with the Tennessee KSA – Listen for Understanding, Talking
With Respect
and Getting Along With Others; and the EFF Standards – Lis-
ten Actively
and Speak So Others Can Understand. (Appendix II)
Teaching Strategy: The concepts of effective communication, the com-
munication process, and overcoming barriers are all critical pieces to our
ability to function in the world and cooperate with others and are all tied
to our ability to communicate effectively. Learners were introduced to the
M E S S A G E
communication process during the first day introductions.
Sender
Receiver
The Communication Process Loop should be displayed in the room.
Throughout Learning Skills, teachers can use this visual to review the
F E E D B A C K
communication loop and to help students remember the process.
L E A R N I N G S K I L L S
79

Communication Process
Lesson 7
The lesson is taught using the Read, Write and Discuss method. The
teacher will begin the lesson by defining communication, identifying the
Read
elements of the communication process, and explaining why it is impor-
tant. Direct learners to take notes from the board and draw the visual of
the communication loop in their notes.
Teachers will facilitate the discussion by asking students to recall their expe-
Discuss
Write
riences with communication and participate in a learning activity that
demonstrates the problems that can occur with one-way communication.
Lesson Plan
Homework Review: Academic Survival Guide
Thought for the Day
“Education is our passport to the future, for tomorrow belongs to
those who prepare for it today.”

Teaching Tip
—Malcolm X
Begin each day with a
Prepare for success today. Don’t procrastinate by putting things off. Get
review of the previous
educated in order to create a bridge to your future.
day’s homework. Give 15-20
minutes to review the homework.
Introduction
Then begin the “Thought for the
Communication is the process of sharing our ideas, thoughts, and feel-
ings with other people and having those ideas, thoughts, and feelings
Day.” Give students time to
understood by the people we are talking with. When we communicate we
answer the four questions. Then
speak, listen, and observe.
discuss the “Thought for the
Day.”
The way we communicate is a learned style. As children we learn from
watching our parents and other adults communicate. As an adult we can
learn to improve the way we communicate by observing others who com-
municate effectively, learning new skills, and practicing those skills.
Attention: The ability to effectively communicate at work, home, and in
life is probably one of the most important sets of skills a person needs.
What would our life and world be like without communication? We can-
not get along without it. It is also not easy, and we all have probably had
experiences where our communication failed or ran into a barrier. So, if
we can understand the communication process better and improve it, we
will become a more effective and successful communicator.
80
L E A R N I N G S K I L L S

Communication Process
Lesson 7
Objective: (To demonstrate the many problems of misunderstanding
that can occur in a one-way communication.)
Motivation: As you continue to reach your goals, specifically your educa-
tional goals, communication will become increasingly more important.
The ability to effectively communicate is a primary skill. The more you
become an effective communicator the more likely you are to achieve
what you want. Over 80% of your waking life is spent sending or receiv-
ing information. Poor communication can waste time and energy and
cause conflict between people. Let’s think of how you can benefit by
improving your communication skills: You will have a clearer under-
standing of what people are saying to you, others will be less likely to mis-
understand you, problems will be solved quickly, you will be able to
identify others’ needs and you will be able to resolve conflict.
At another time we will take a more in-depth look at the EFF Communica-
tion Standards of Speaking So Others Understand and Listen Actively. At this
point we are putting those communication skills into the larger context.
This lesson provides a foundation for developing effective communication
skills at work, at home with the family, and in our everyday activities.
Overview for Learners: This lesson will cover what effective commu-
nication is, the key elements of the process, the various ways we commu-
nicate, and a brief look at barriers that get in the way. Let’s begin by
looking at the definition of effective communication.
Body of the Lesson
Main Point 1. Effective Communication
A good working definition for effective communication is to share mean-
ing and understanding between the person sending the message and the
Teaching Tip
person receiving the message. The key element is “understanding.”
Develop the student
Lead-off Question:
How have you had a communication prob-
responses and connect
lem or failure to communicate?
them to the lesson objective.
Anticipated Responses:
Students will offer a variety of
personal experiences that illustrate difficulty
in communicating.

Follow-up Question:
Was there a miscommunication because of a
lack of understanding?
Anticipated Responses:
Yes, explore the student’s responses.
L E A R N I N G S K I L L S
81

Communication Process
Lesson 7
So in order to be an effective communicator, we must first and foremost
be understood in our various communications.
Main Point 2. Communication Process
Now that you understand the purposes of effective communication, let’s
take a closer look at the elements in the communication process. By ana-
lyzing the parts of the process, we are better able to understand the whole.
Teaching Tip
The communication process is a simple model that demonstrates all the
Students will some-
factors that can affect communication. Communication is effective if the
times forget to mention
message that is received is the same one that is sent.
nonverbal communication.
Communication Process and the Key Elements: Tell students to look at
the communication loop. Explain that the Communication Process breaks

A learning styles inventory
down effective communication into the following steps:
could help students identify how
A. Sender – The communicator or sender is the person who is sending
they receive or learn information
the message. There are two factors that will determine how effective the
in a certain way: verbal, visual,
communicator will be. The first factor is the communicator’s attitude. It
must be positive. The second factor is the communicator’s selection of
kinesthetic/tactile.
meaningful symbols, or selecting the right symbols depending on your
audience and the right environment. Talk about a few wrong examples.
Question:
Name some of the ways we communicate.
Anticipated Responses: —Talking, speaking
M E S S A G E
—Writing
—Pictures, symbols, diagrams, charts, etc.

Sender
Receiver
B. Message – A communication in writing, in speech, or by signals
F E E D B A C K
C. Receiver – The receiver is simply the person receiving the message,
making sense of it, or understanding and translating it into meaning. Now
think about this for a moment: the receiver is also a communicator. How
can that be? (When receiver responds, he is then the communicator.)
Communication is only successful when the reaction of the receiver is that
which the communicator intended. Effective communication takes place
with shared meaning and understanding.
D. Feedback – Feedback is that reaction I just mentioned. It can be a ver-
bal or nonverbal reaction or response. It can be external feedback (some-
thing we see) or internal feedback (something we can’t see), like
82
L E A R N I N G S K I L L S

Communication Process
Lesson 7
self-examination. It’s the feedback that allows the communicator to
adjust his message and be more effective. Without feedback, there would
be no way of knowing if meaning had been shared or if understanding
had taken place.
Teaching Tip
Discuss that communication is a two-way process. The information goes
out to a person on the other end. There is a sender and a receiver. Simply
Tell students to draw
put, effective communication is getting your message across to the receiv-
the communication loop
er. It is the sender’s responsibility to make sure that the receiver gets the
on their Note Taker.
message and that the message received is the one sent.
Communicating is not an isolated series of one skill, it involves several
skills. For example, speaking involves not only getting your message
across but also being able to listen and understand what others are saying
(active listening) and observing the verbal and nonverbal clues in order
to monitor the effectiveness of your message.
Main Point 3. Barriers
Have you ever been talking to someone and they misunderstand what
you were saying? Why do you think that happens? (Give learners the
opportunity to share their experiences.) At any point in the communica-
tion process a barrier can occur. Barriers keep us from understanding
other’s ideas and thoughts. Barriers can appear at any point of the com-
munication loop.
M E S S A G E
There are two types of barriers—internal and external. Examples of inter-
nal barriers are fatigue, poor listening skills, attitude toward the sender or
Sender
Receiver
the information, lack of interest in the message, fear, mistrust, past expe-
F
riences, negative attitude, problems at home, lack of common experi-
E E D B A C K
ences, and emotions. Examples of external barriers include noise,
distractions, e-mail not working, bad phone connections, time of day,
sender used too many technical words for the audience, and environ-
ment. Barriers keep the message from getting through. When communi-
cating, watch out for barriers. Monitor the actions of the receiver. Watch
her body language; check to make sure the message the receiver received
is the one sent—ask questions and listen.
L E A R N I N G S K I L L S
83

Communication Process
Lesson 7
Main Point 4. Types of Communication
A. Self-Action or One-Way Communication is focused on
getting the message to the receiver. Self-action treats com-
munication as a manipulation of others. It is very message
centered. There is no way to know if the meaning is shared
between the sender and the receiver. (To demonstrate one-way communi-
cation, do the following activity with the class.)
Procedure: (Using the attached diagram, ask for a student volunteer
from the class to assist in this demonstration about communication.
Explain to the other students that the volunteer is going to describe
something to them and their task is to simply follow instructions in
sketching out exactly what is described.
Take the volunteer outside of the classroom to explain the following
directions. Provide the volunteer with the diagram shown. Tell the volun-
teer to describe the diagram to the rest of the class. However, the volun-
teer must keep his or her back toward the rest of the class. There can be
no eye contact. The volunteer can only use verbal communication to
describe the diagram, i.e., no gestures, hand signals, etc. Further, no ques-
tions are allowed on the part of the other students. In brief, only one-way
communication is allowed.
When the activity is completed, show the correct diagram to the students.
Have the students show each other their drawings. Students get a laugh at
their attempts and how they misunderstood the words they heard.
4
3
5
2
1
84
L E A R N I N G S K I L L S

Communication Process
Lesson 7
Teacher will indicate that the activity was constructed to prove a point,
and only a few students ever come close to drawing the actual diagram.
Explain how easy it is for miscommunication to occur.)
Discussion Questions:
1. How many of us got confused and just “quit” listening? Why?
2. Why was the one-way communication so difficult to follow?
3. Even two-way communication cannot ensure complete understanding.
How can we make our communication efforts more effective?
B. Interaction or Two-Way Communication. This approach
recognizes the role of the receiver as a communicator
through feedback. It is message centered and is a very sim-
plistic view of the communication process. Feedback allows
senders to see if their message got across.
C. Transaction. This approach focuses on meaning and
sharing by accounting for all other factors in the communi-
cation process. It is concerned with the barriers that might
affect the communication. Transaction is best described as
effective communication. This is when the communication process is
applied and carried out completely. The sender gives a message that is
passed on to the receiver. In return, the receiver can give clear feedback
that allows the sender to know whether or not the message was perceived
as intended. If the message wasn’t received as intended, then the sender
will continue the communication process again in order to ensure effec-
tive communication.
Now that you know all three types of communication, we can reflect and
evaluate our own communication approaches in different roles and situ-
ations. Knowing the three approaches to communication will help us to
be aware of our types, when they occur, and how to improve our com-
munication and create clear transactions.
Conclusion
Effective communication is a major part in achieving your educational
goals. Effectively communicating with your teachers and peers is essential
when it comes to your learning. Many times your instructor is the sender.
Her job is to send you messages that include information about the skill
you need to learn. Your instructor’s messages might include lectures or
handouts for you.
L E A R N I N G S K I L L S
85

Communication Process
Lesson 7
Your peers can also be the senders of a message. Many times learners are
asked to work together as a team. You might be asked to work on a specif-
ic activity that would require you to receive messages from other team
members or an appointed leader. Sometimes you may be asked to be the
sender. Remember that communication involves speaking, listening, and
observing.
Summary: Communication is a two-way process that involves getting
your message across and understanding what others have to say. Commu-
nication involves active listening, speaking and observing. Now that you
have learned the communication process, you can begin to evaluate your
communication skills. Begin to watch yourself in action. Each time you
communicate observe what you do, how it went, what went well, and
what could have been better.
Re-Motivation: The ability to effectively communicate is a critical skill.
The more you become an effective communicator the more likely you are
to achieve what you want. Remember, you can improve your communi-
cation skills by observing people who communicate effectively, learning
new skills, and practicing those skills. Acquiring effective communication
skills will help you be a better student, parent, family member, worker,
and citizen.
86
L E A R N I N G S K I L L S

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