This is not the document you are looking for? Use the search form below to find more!

Report home > Education

EMT-B Student Handbook

0.00 (0 votes)
Document Description
The Utah Department of Health, Bureau of Emergency Medical Services (BEMS) is charged with ensuring the quality of prehospital emergency medical care. This is accomplished by establishing training standards for Emergency Medical Service (EMS) personnel with input from the medical community and advisory committees. As an Emergency Medical Technician Basic (EMT-B) student, you are responsible for conducting yourself in this course in accordance with these training standards and, ultimately, preparing yourself for certification. This handbook is designed to acquaint you, as a student, with the requirements that must be met in order for you to be approved and certified by BEMS. A thorough knowledge of the material contained herein will help ensure highly trained and qualified EMT-Bs in Utah. Please contact BEMS if you have any questions.
File Details
  • Added: October, 03rd 2010
  • Reads: 739
  • Downloads: 8
  • File size: 211.46kb
  • Pages: 47
  • Tags: lifelong learning, training, certification
  • content preview
Submitter
  • Name: emily
Embed Code:

Add New Comment




Related Documents

Rock Point School 2012 Student Handbook

by: rpsroboto, 151 pages

This is the Rock Point School student handbook from 2012. The intent here is to increase transparency of the school by making documentation available readily.

Sunset Cliffs Aikido Student Handbook

by: manualzon, 13 pages

aikido handbook and ebook covers many techniques of aikido as taught by the aikido founder Morihei Ueshiba

IEC Student handbook 2011-12

by: iec, 19 pages

Thid document consists all the information about the IEC Group of Institutions,its history,vision etc....

Prehospital Emergency Care (8th Edition) by Keith J. Karren

by: rubadah, 2 pages

Prehospital Emergency Care (8th Edition) by Keith J. Karren Emergency Care The most complete resource for EMT-B training, this best-selling, ...

Ashford Student Writing Handbook

by: tetsuo, 25 pages

Ashford Student Writing Handbook

POPULATION HANDBOOK

by: fitzgibbons, 73 pages

Since its publication in 1978, PRB’s Population Handbook has appeared in eight languages and has been circulated around the world. It has been used by thousands of teachers and students in ...

HANDBOOK ON NUCLEAR LAW

by: fitzgibbons, 174 pages

This handbook endeavors to explain the overall character of nuclear law and the process by which it is developed and applied. This is the subject of Part I (Chapters 1–3), which also contains ...

Preparation of Protein-Stabilized b-Carotene Nanodispersions by Emulsification - Evaporation Method

by: shinta, 10 pages

This work was initiated to prepare protein- stabilized b-carotene nanodispersions using emulsification– evaporation. A pre-mix of the aqueous phase composed of a protein and ...

Suppression on the Aflatoxin-B Production and the Growth of Aspergillus flavus by Lactic Acid Bacteria {Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus plantarum)

by: shinta, 6 pages

This research was aimed to study the potency of lactic acid bacteria in the inhibition of A. flavus growth and the production of aflatoxin-B. Three species of the bacteria i.e., Lactobacillus ...

CHROMATOGRAPHIC STUDY OF PHOTOLYSIS OF AQUEOUS CYANOCOBALAMIN SOLUTION IN PRESENCE OF VITAMINS B AND C

by: shinta, 6 pages

Aqueous cyanocobalamin solutions (pH 1-7) have been photolysed in the presence of individual B (thiamine HCl, riboflavin, nicotinamide and pyridoxine HCl) and C (ascorbic acid) vitamins ...

Content Preview
STUDENT HANDBOOK
Emergency Medical Technician - Basic







UTAH DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
DIVISION OF HEALTH SYSTEMS IMPROVEMENT
BUREAU OF EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES



January
2009














Table of Contents


INTRODUCTION.................................................................................................................................................................................................. 4
THE IMPORTANCE OF LIFELONG LEARNING.......................................................................................................................................... 4
JOB DESCRIPTION SUMMARY OF THE EMT-BASIC................................................................................................................................ 4
BUREAU OF EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES FUNCTIONAL POSITION DESCRIPTIONS ....................................................... 6
INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 6
QUALIFICATIONS:................................................................................................................................................................................................. 6
EMS PROVIDER COMPETENCY AREAS....................................................................................................................................................... 7
EMT-B ................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 7
EMT-I.................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 7
EMT-IA............................................................................................................................................................................................................... 7
PARAMEDIC ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 8
EMT-B TRAINING COURSE.............................................................................................................................................................................. 9
COURSE GOALS ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 9
UTAH SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES (USO)............................................................................................................................................................. 9
PREREQUISITES FOR ADMITANCE INTO EMT-B COURSE ...................................................................................................................... 9
STUDENT EXPECTATIONS .......................................................................................................................................................................... 10
CLINICAL EXPERIENCE ............................................................................................................................................................................... 11
EMT-BASIC RECERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS................................................................................................................................. 12
TABLE 1: EMT-B CME...................................................................................................................................................................................... 13
SPECIFIED SKILLS ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 13
EMT-BASIC COURSE OUTLINE ................................................................................................................................................................... 14
EMT-BASIC: COURSE CONTENT................................................................................................................................................................. 16
COLLEGE CREDIT ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 20
EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN – BASIC PRACTICAL TRAINING RECORD ...................................................................... 21
PATIENT ASSESSMENT FORM...................................................................................................................................................................... 23
NEED-TO-KNOW ABBREVIATIONS............................................................................................................................................................. 24
EMT-B NATIONAL STANDARD CURRICULUM OBJECTIVES .............................................................................................................. 25
INTRO TO EMERGENCY CARE.................................................................................................................................................................... 25
WELL BEING OF THE EMT ........................................................................................................................................................................... 25
MEDICAL/LEGAL ISSUES............................................................................................................................................................................. 26
HUMAN BODY................................................................................................................................................................................................ 26
VITALS AND SAMPLE................................................................................................................................................................................... 26
LIFTING AND MOVING ................................................................................................................................................................................. 27
AIRWAY .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 28
SCENE SIZE UP ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 29
INITIAL ASSESSMENT .................................................................................................................................................................................. 30
FOCUSED HISTORY/EXAMINATION TRAUMA........................................................................................................................................ 31
FOCUSED HISTORY/EXAM MEDICAL ....................................................................................................................................................... 31
DETAILED EXAM........................................................................................................................................................................................... 32
ON GOING ASSESSMENT ............................................................................................................................................................................. 32
COMMUNICATIONS ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 32
DOCUMENTATION ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 33
PHARMACOLOGY ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 33
RESPIRATORY................................................................................................................................................................................................ 34
CARDIAC EMERGENCIES ............................................................................................................................................................................ 34
DIABETES/ALTERED MENTAL STATUS.................................................................................................................................................... 36
ALLERGIES ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 36

2

POISONING/OVERDOSE ............................................................................................................................................................................... 37
ENVIRONMENTAL ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 37
BEHAVIORAL ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 38
OB/GYN ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 38
BLEEDING AND SHOCK ............................................................................................................................................................................... 39
SOFT TISSUE INJURIES ................................................................................................................................................................................. 40
MUSCULOSKELETAL ................................................................................................................................................................................... 41
INJURIES TO HEAD SPINE ............................................................................................................................................................................ 41
INFANTS & CHILDREN ................................................................................................................................................................................. 42
AMBULANCE OPERATIONS ........................................................................................................................................................................ 43
GAINING ACCESS .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 44
OVERVIEWS ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 44
EMT-B CME HOURS TRACKING FORM ..................................................................................................................................................... 46
YOUR COURSE INFORMATION.................................................................................................................................................................... 47
UTAH BUREAU OF EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES CONTACT INFORMATION: ................................................................... 47



3

INTRODUCTION

The Utah Department of Health, Bureau of Emergency Medical Services (BEMS) is charged with ensuring the quality of
prehospital emergency medical care. This is accomplished by establishing training standards for Emergency Medical
Service (EMS) personnel with input from the medical community and advisory committees. As an Emergency Medical
Technician Basic (EMT-B) student, you are responsible for conducting yourself in this course in accordance with these
training standards and, ultimately, preparing yourself for certification.

This handbook is designed to acquaint you, as a student, with the requirements that must be met in order for you to be
approved and certified by BEMS. A thorough knowledge of the material contained herein will help ensure highly trained
and qualified EMT-Bs in Utah. Please contact BEMS if you have any questions.

THE IMPORTANCE OF LIFELONG LEARNING

This curriculum is designed to provide the student with the essentials to serve as an EMT-B. The 120-hour minimum time
length of this program, as adopted by BEMS from the Department of Transportation (DOT) National Standard Curriculum
(NSC) EMT-B, necessitates enrichment and continuing education in order to bring the student to full competency. This
initial program will provide the basics to perform the duties as an EMT-B, but continuing education, experience, and growth
is needed to become a competent EMT-B. Continuing education is critical to ensure competency is maintained throughout
a person’s career in Emergency Medical Services and in the medical profession. Change is a constant process in all
professions, especially in the medical professions, and to keep up with the changes professionals need to incorporate
continued learning as a permanent part of their lives.

JOB DESCRIPTION SUMMARY OF THE EMT-BASIC


Responds to emergency calls.

Provides efficient and immediate care to the critically ill and injured.

Transports the patient to a medical facility.
• After receiving the call from the dispatcher, drives the ambulance to address or location given, using the most
expeditious route, depending on traffic and weather conditions.

Observes traffic ordinances and regulations concerning emergency vehicle operation.

Upon arrival at the scene of crash or illness, parks the ambulance in a safe location to avoid additional injury.

Prior to initiating patient care:

Completes a size-up of the scene to determine that the scene is safe.

Determines the mechanism of injury or nature of illness.

Determines the total number of patients.

Requests additional help, if necessary.

In the absence of law enforcement, creates a safe traffic environment, such as:

The placement of road flares.

Removal of debris.

Re-direction of traffic for the protection of the injured and those assisting in the care of injured patients.

Determines the nature and extent of illness or injury and establishes priority for required emergency care.

Based on assessment findings, renders emergency medical care to adult, infant and child, medical, and trauma
patients. Duties include but not limited to:

Opening and maintaining an airway.

Ventilating patients.

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, including use of automated external defibrillators.

Provide prehospital emergency medical care of simple and multiple system trauma such as:
• Controlling
hemorrhage.

Treatment of shock (hypoperfusion).
• Bandaging
wounds.

Immobilization of painful, swollen, and deformed extremities.

Provide prehospital emergency care for the medical patient including:

Assisting in childbirth.

Management of respiratory.

Cardiac, diabetic, allergic, behavioral and environmental emergencies.

Suspected poisonings.

4


Searches for medical identification emblem as a clue in providing emergency care.

Additional care and/or interventions are provided based upon assessment of the patient and obtaining historical
information. These interventions include assisting patients with prescribed medications including:
• Sublingual
nitroglycerin.
• Epinephrine
auto-injectors.

Hand-held aerosol inhalers.

Responsible for administration of other medications such as:
• Oxygen.

Oral glucose.
• Activated
charcoal.
• Upon affiliation with a prehospital agency, recognizing and learning that agency’s protocol for all medication
administration and interventions.

Reassures patients and bystanders by working in a confident, efficient manner.

Avoids mishandling and undue haste while working expeditiously to accomplish the task.

Where a patient must be extricated from entrapment:

Assesses the extent of injury.

Gives all possible emergency care and protection to the entrapped patient.

Uses the prescribed techniques and appliances for safely removing the patient.

When needed, radios the dispatcher for additional help or special rescue and/or utility services.

Provides simple rescue service if the ambulance has not been accompanied by a specialized unit.

After extrication, provides additional care in triaging the injured in accordance with standard emergency procedures.

Complies with regulations on the handling of the deceased:
• Notifies
authorities.

Arranges for protection of property and evidence at the scene.

Lifts stretcher, placing in ambulance and secures the patient and stretcher, continues emergency medical care.

From the knowledge of the condition of the patient and the extent of injuries and the relative locations and staffing of
emergency hospital facilities, determines the most appropriate facility to which the patient will be transported, unless
otherwise directed by medical direction.

Reports directly to the emergency department or communications center:

The nature and extent of injuries.

The number being transported.

The destination to assure prompt medical care upon arrival at the facility.

Identifies assessment findings which may require communications with medical direction for advice and for notification
that special professional services and assistance be immediately available upon arrival at the medical facility.

Constantly assesses patient(s) en-route to emergency facility.

Administers additional care as indicated or directed by medical direction.

Assists in lifting and carrying the patient out of the ambulance and into the receiving facility.

Reports verbally and in writing, observation and emergency medical care of the patient at the emergency scene and in
transit to the receiving facility staff for purposes of records and diagnostics.

Upon request, provides assistance to the receiving facility staff.

After each call:

Restocks and replaces used linens, blankets and other supplies.

Cleans all equipment following appropriate disinfecting procedures.

Makes careful check of all equipment so that the ambulance is ready for the next run.

Maintains ambulance in efficient operating condition.

In accordance with local, state or federal regulations, decontaminates the interior of the vehicle after transport of
patient with contagious infection or hazardous materials exposure.

Determines that vehicle is in proper mechanical condition by checking items required by service management.

Maintains familiarity with specialized equipment used by the service.

Attends continuing education and refresher training programs as required by employers, medical direction, licensing
or certifying agencies.

Meets qualifications within the Functional Position Description.




5

BUREAU OF EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES FUNCTIONAL POSITION DESCRIPTIONS

Introduction
The following is a general position description for the EMT-B, Emergency Medical Technician - Intermediate (EMT-I),
Emergency Medical Technician-Intermediate Advanced (EMT-IA), and Paramedic. This will help anyone understand what
qualifications, competencies and tasks are required of the EMT-B, EMT-I, EMT-IA, or Paramedic. It is the ultimate
responsibility of an employer to define specific job descriptions within each EMS entity.

Qualifications:
To be certified as an EMT-B, EMT-I, EMT-IA, or Paramedic, an individual shall:

1.
Submit a completed application form to BEMS.
2.
Be 18 years of age or older.
3.
Complete a BEMS approved EMT-B, EMT-I, EMT-IA, or Paramedic course.
4.
Display technical competence during field and clinical training.
5.
Successfully complete the BEMS written and practical examinations for the applicable certification level.

Generally, the knowledge and skills required show the need for:

A high school education or equivalent

Ability to communicate verbally via telephone and radio equipment

Ability to lift, carry, and balance up to 125 pounds (250 with assistance)

Ability to interpret written and oral instructions

Ability to use good judgment and remain calm in high-stress situations

Ability to work effectively in an environment with loud noises and flashing lights

Ability to function efficiently throughout an entire work shift

Ability to calculate weight and volume ratios and read small print under life-threatening time constraints

Ability to read and understand English language manuals and road maps

Ability to accurately discern street signs and address numbers

Ability to interview patient, family members and bystanders

Ability to document, in writing, all relevant information in prescribed format in light of legal ramifications of such

Ability to converse in English with co-workers and hospital staff as to patient status

Good manual dexterity, with ability to perform all tasks related to highest quality patient care

Ability to bend, stoop, and crawl on uneven terrain

Ability to withstand varied environmental conditions such as extreme heat, cold, and moisture

Ability to work in low light, confined spaces and other dangerous environments

6

EMS Provider Competency Areas

The following are summaries of the prehospital certification competencies. This is intended to serve as quick reference for
the EMT-B student interesting in advancing their EMS career not a complete reference. See the applicable DOT NSC for
all competency areas.

EMT-B

The EMT-B must demonstrate competency handling medical emergencies utilizing Basic Life Support equipment and skills
in accordance with all behavioral objectives in the DOT/EMT-B 1994 curriculum. These objectives include but are not
limited to assessment of a patient, handling emergencies, using Basic Life Support equipment and techniques, CPR,
bleeding control, provide non- invasive treatment of hypoperfusion, stabilize / immobilize injured bones and the spine,
manage environmental emergencies, emergency childbirth, and use of a semi-automatic defibrillator. The EMT-B training
requires at least 120 hours of training and 10 hours clinical.

Patient assisted medication administration competency includes:

• Nitroglycerin,
• Epinephrine by Auto-Injector,
• Aspirin,
• Oral Glucose
• Prescribed
Inhaler,
• Activated
Charcoal



EMT-I

The EMT-I must demonstrate competency handling emergencies utilizing Basic and Advanced Life Support equipment and
skills in accordance with all behavioral objectives in the DOT/EMT-B 1994and EMT-I 1998 NSC Utah subset. These
objectives include but are not limited to key advanced-care skills, patient assessment skills, advanced airway adjuncts,
intravenous therapy, defibrillation, and interpretation of basic cardiac dysrthythmias. The EMT-I course requires at least 54
hours of training to complete.

Medication administration competency includes:

• Activated
Charcoal,
• Lidocaine,
(ONLY for pulseless v-tach/v-
• Albuterol Sulfate or equivalent,
fib after administration of epinephrine)
• Aspirin,
• Lidocaine IV Drip,
• Dextrose
50%,
• Morphine
Sulfate,
• Epinephrine
1:1,000,
• Naloxone,
(Narcan)
• Epinephrine
1:10,000,
• Nitroglycerine (tablets or spray),
• Irrigation
solution,
• Normal
Saline

• Ringers
Lactate


EMT-IA

The EMT-IA must demonstrate competency handling emergencies utilizing Basic and Advanced Life support equipment
and skills in accordance with all behavioral objectives in the DOT/EMT-B and EMT-I 1998 NSC. They demonstrate
competency in all EMT-B skills and equipment usage. Must be able to provide Advanced Life Support using intravenous
therapy, defibrillator and advanced airway adjuncts to control the airway in cases of respiratory and cardiac arrest. The
EMT-IA is competency based and usually takes around 200 hours of training and 300-600 hours clinical and field time.

Medication administration competency includes:


7

• Activated
Charcoal,
• Furosemide,
• Adenosine,
• Irrigation
solution,
• Albuterol Sulfate or equivalent,
• Lidocaine,
• Aspirin,
• Lidocaine IV Drip,
• Atropine
Sulfate,
• Morphine
Sulfate,
• Dextrose
50%,
• Naloxone,
• Glucagon
• Nitroglycerine (tablets or spray),
• Diazepam,
• Normal
Saline
• Epinephrine
1:1,000,
• Ringers
Lactate
• Epinephrine
1:10,000,



PARAMEDIC

The Paramedic must demonstrate competency handling emergencies utilizing all Basic and Advanced Life Support
equipment and skills in accordance with all behavioral objectives in the DOT/EMT-B 1994 and Paramedic 1998 NSC.
They must demonstrate competency in all EMT-B skills and equipment usage. They will be able to provide Advanced Life
Support using intravenous therapy, defibrillator and advanced airway adjuncts to control the airway in cases of respiratory
and cardiac arrest.

Medication administration competency includes:

• Activated
Charcoal,
• Irrigation
solution,
• Albuterol
Sulfate,
• Lidocaine,
• Ammonia
capsules,
• Lidocaine IV drip,
• Atropine
Sulfate,
• Meperidine,
• Aspirin,
• Morphine
Sulfate,
• Dextrose
50%,
• Naloxone,
• Diazepam,
• Nitroglycerine,
• Diphenhydramine,
• Normal
Saline,
• Dopamine,
• Oxytocin,
• Epinephrine
1:1,000,
• Promethazine,
• Epinephrine
1:10,000,
• Ringers
Lactate
• Furosemide,
• Sodium
Bicarbonate





8

EMT-B TRAINING COURSE

COURSE GOALS

After successful completion of the program, the student will be capable of performing the following functions at the
minimum entry level:

1.
Recognize the nature and seriousness of a patient’s condition or extent of injuries to assess requirements for
emergency medical care;
2.
Administer appropriate emergency medical care based on assessment findings of the patient’s condition;
3.
Lift, move, position and otherwise handle the patient to minimize discomfort and prevent further injury;
4.
In a mass casualty incident, perform triage; and,
5.
Perform safely and effectively the expectations of the job description.

The basic course is a minimum of 120 hours in length. There are 46 lessons in the NSC. In addition to the required 120
hours of instruction, this course requires that the student have a minimum of 10 hours in a clinical or field setting with an
emphasis on patient interactions.

The EMT-B student should acquire an appreciation on ongoing education. Two concepts should be focused on to achieve
this goal:

1.
During the initial EMT-B training, additional education in related content may be studied.
2.
Ongoing education is an integral component of any educational process and the EMT-B should be committed to a
process of life-long learning.


UTAH SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES (USO)

10 hours of training have been added to the Utah EMT-B course content since the original adoption of the 1994 NSC,
EMT-B. In additional to the 46 NSC lessons, 6 lessons with content that was identified as being deficient in the core NSC
were added as a requirement for all EMT-B courses in Utah. These are called the Utah Specific Objectives. These
additional hours were implemented to enhance areas of needed training outside of the original scope of the NSC.
Objectives as well as supplemental training information on these subjects have been compiled in the document Utah
Specific Objectives for the Emergency Medical Technician – Basic 2007 (USOB). The USOB is available on the BEMS
web site in the Training section.

PREREQUISITES FOR ADMITANCE INTO EMT-B COURSE

CPR Certification:

The prospective EMT-B student must have a current CPR card prior to entering the program.

Acceptable certifications include:
American Heart Association - Health Care Provider
American Red Cross - Professional Rescuer
National Safety Council Certification
A course that the applicant can demonstrate to BEMS to be equivalent or greater

Although CPR training is a prerequisite, it should be routinely practiced and integrated throughout the entire instruction of
the EMT-B Course. (Several EMT-B courses offer CPR instruction courses before the start of the EMT-B course).

Age Restriction:

The prospective EMT-B must be at least 18 years old within 120 days at the completion of the course to be eligible for
enrollment.


9

STUDENT EXPECTATIONS

This training program is detailed and exacting. The EMT-B is an important, recognized part of the medical team. The
standards are high and will remain high in order to maintain the respected position on the medical team and in the
community. To become a fully certified EMT-B, it will be necessary for the student to comply with certain requirements.
These requirements are as follows:

1. Attendance - Students will be required to attend all scheduled classes. If for some reason the student is unable to
attend a class (illness, etc.), they must make arrangements with the Course Coordinator to make up the material
missed. Each student will be responsible to have at least 120 hours of documented class time.

2. Class
Participation - Students will be evaluated by the Instructors, Course Coordinator, and Medical Director
during the entire course in such areas as dependability, attitude, maturity, and the ability to relate well with others
as well as the students ability to achieve acceptable performance levels. Remediation will be provided by the
Course Coordinator or Instructors for students having difficulties in any area of the course.

3. Documentation – BEMS requires the following documents be submitted for each student prior to the student being
allowed to take the state written or practical testing:

a. Application
Form - The application form must be completed, signed and notarized before sending it to
BEMS. Incomplete applications will be returned and may delay the certification process. The application
must be completely filled out, especially criminal histories. BEMS will conduct a thorough background
investigation through the Utah Bureau of Criminal Investigations. If the student has a questionable criminal
history, he/she should contact BEMS PRIOR to beginning the course. If a student has not lived in Utah for
the past five years, fingerprint must be submitted to BEMS for an FBI check

b.
Declaration of Understanding. - Each student must read, understand, notarize, and sign a Declaration of
Understanding. The student is also responsible to submit to BEMS, with the application, pages seven and
eight of the document.

c.
Student Acknowledgement of Bureau of Emergency Medical Services Policies and Procedures. –
Each student must read, understand and sign Student Acknowledgement of Bureau Policies and
Procedures. The Course Coordinator will make a copy, file one in your records, and return the second one
to you.

d.
Letter of Recommendation for Certification. - The Course Coordinator and Medical Director will sign a
document that states the student has attended at least 120 hours of the course, successfully completed all
written and practical training, and meets BEMS requirements for initial certification. If the Course
Coordinator or Medical Director feels a student has not met the appropriate requirements he/she may elect
not to recommend a student for certification.

4. Fees - BEMS requires specific fees for testing, certification, and background investigations. These fees may be
paid by the Course Coordinator as part of the course fees or the individual students may be required to pay them.
Students will not be allowed to take the BEMS written and practical examinations until all fees are paid. In the
event a student does not show for the practical test or fails a test and a retest is necessary, retest fees must be
paid to BEMS prior to the desired retest date. All certification fees are non-refundable.

5. Identification
- Students will be provided with an identification badge. Students should wear it at all times,
especially during the clinical portion of the course.

6.

Practical Training Record - At the beginning of the course the students will be given a Practical Training Record,
which must be signed off by the Instructors and clinical personnel during each phase of the training. This
completed report will be signed by the Course Coordinator and Medical Director attesting to the skills and abilities
of the student.

7. Clinical
Experience - The student will be required to spend 10 hours in a clinical environment which should
include at least five patient assessments, complete with Incident Report Forms filled out as if they were practicing
in the field. This is accomplished in a hospital and/or ambulance setting. Please make every possible attempt to

10

Download
EMT-B Student Handbook

 

 

Your download will begin in a moment.
If it doesn't, click here to try again.

Share EMT-B Student Handbook to:

Insert your wordpress URL:

example:

http://myblog.wordpress.com/
or
http://myblog.com/

Share EMT-B Student Handbook as:

From:

To:

Share EMT-B Student Handbook.

Enter two words as shown below. If you cannot read the words, click the refresh icon.

loading

Share EMT-B Student Handbook as:

Copy html code above and paste to your web page.

loading