This is not the document you are looking for? Use the search form below to find more!

Report home > Education

Fiedler's Contingency Theory

0.00 (0 votes)
Document Description
Fiedler's Contingency Theory shows the relationship between the leader's orientation or style and group performance under differing situational conditions. The theory is based on determining the orientation of the leader (relationship or task), the elements of the situation (leader-member relations,task structure, and leader position power), and the leader orientation that was found to be most effective as the situation changed from low to moderate to high control. Fiedler found that task oriented leaders were more effective in low and moderate control situations and relationship oriented managers were more effective in moderate control situations.
File Details
  • Added: October, 20th 2010
  • Reads: 3688
  • Downloads: 27
  • File size: 25.63kb
  • Pages: 2
  • Tags: increasing, effectiveness, leader
  • content preview
Submitter
  • Name: radenka
Embed Code:

Add New Comment




Related Documents

Adapting Brown and Levinson's 'Politeness' Theory to the Analysis ...

by: hakem, 8 pages

In this paper, I will begin by briefly describing Brown and Levinson's 'politeness' theory and identifying a type of interaction which their list of 'politeness' strategies does not cover: non- ...

CONTINGENCY THEORY: SCIENCE OR TECHNOLOGY

by: niklas, 8 pages

An answer to the research question, 'Is Contingency Theory Science or Technology?' is proposed in this paper. Contingency theories and a contingency perspective are popular among researchers in ...

Structural Contingency Theory and Individual Differences ...

by: altea, 8 pages

This article develops and testsa structurally based, integrated theory of person-team fit. The theory developed is an extension of structural contingency theory and considers issues of external fit ...

KNOWLEDGE AS A CONTINGENCY VARIABLE FOR ORGANIZING KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS

by: mandy, 13 pages

The knowledge-based-view (KBV) of the firm has received wide acceptance and support. This view recognizes that knowledge is an asset with as much importance as capital to an organization. With this ...

1,2 Simple Explanation of Einstein's Relativity Theory

by: marco, 15 pages

Einstein explained that when there is a relative velocity (V) between two observers, the clock of the other observer appears to run more slowly by a contraction factor K given as follows, where c is ...

Nursing diagnoses in a patient with Hemolytic Anemia due to poor FUNCTIONING OF THE BIOLOGIC MITRAL VALVE, ACCORDING TO CALLISTA ROY'S ADAPTATION THEORY AND THE NANDA'S TAXONOMY II

by: norris, 5 pages

Hemolytic anemia due to poor functioning of the biologic mitral valve happens when the spinal cord is not capable to compensate for, by increasing production, the premature destruction of the blood ...

Important Theories of Leadership and Management in organisations

by: monkey, 12 pages

Very often we can hear today how important good leadership is to run a business successfully. But why? Why do we need good leaders? Why is a good leader essential for running a business? What is ...

ORGANIZING FOR NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT : ALIGNING PROJECT ...

by: hubert, 46 pages

In this research we adopt a multi-method approach to better understand new product development processes in different environments. Drawing on research that distinguishes among three industrial ...

The Quintessence of Axiomatized Special Relativity Theory

by: hanno, 13 pages

Albert Einstein made a simple yet signicant contribution in physics by recognizing the key ideas in the original relativity theory of Henri Poincare and Hendrik Lorentz, by dismissing the very ...

Special Theory of Relativity

by: ruri, 26 pages

In this document we discuss Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity. The treatment is non-mathematical, except for a brief use of Pythagoras' theorem about right triangles. We concentrate on the ...

Content Preview
Fiedler’s Contingency Theory
Fiedler’s Contingency Theory shows the relationship between the leader’s orientation or style and
group performance under differing situational conditions. The theory is based on determining the
orientation of the leader (relationship or task), the elements of the situation (leader-member rela-
tions, task structure, and leader position power), and the leader orientation that was found to be
most effective as the situation changed from low to moderate to high control.
Fiedler found that task oriented leaders were more effective in low and moderate control situations
and relationship oriented managers were more effective in moderate control situations.
Increasing








effectiveness
of the leader

Relationship
Oriented
Correlations
between the
leader’s








orientation and the
leader’s
effectiveness
Task
Oriented
Increasing
effectiveness
of the leader

Increasing favorableness to leader
Leader-member
Good Poor
relations
Task structure
Structured Unstructured Structured Unstructured
Leader position
Strong Weak Strong Weak Strong Weak Strong Weak
power
High control
Moderate
Low control
situation
control situation
situation

Contingency Theory Definitions
Situational Elements
Leader-member relations: The regard with which the leader and the group members hold one another deter-
mines, in part, the ability of the leader to influence the group and the conditions under which he or she can do
so. A leader who is accepted by the group members is in a more favorable situation than one who is not.

Task structure: Factors that determine task structure are 1.) can a decision be demonstrated as correct, 2.)
are the requirements of the task understood by everyone, 3.) is there more than one way to accomplish the
task, and 4.) is there more than one correct solution. If the group’s task is unstructured, and if the leader is no
more knowledgeable that the group about how to accomplish the task, the situation is unfavorable.

Leader position power: Position power is determined at its most basic level by the rewards and punishments
which the leader officially has at his or her disposal for either rewarding or punishing the group members on
the basis of performance. The more power the leader has, the more favorable the situation.
Leader Orientation
Relationship Orientated: (LPC score of 73 and above) Generally, high LPC leaders are more concerned
with personal relations, more sensitive to the feelings of others, and better off at heading off conflict. They use
their good relations with the group to get the job done. They are better able to deal with the complex issues in
making decisions.

In high control situations, they tend to become bored and are no longer challenged. They may seek
approval from their superiors ignoring their subordinates, or they may try to reorganize the task. As a result,
they often become inconsiderate toward their subordinates, more punishing, and more concerned with per-
formance of the task.

In moderate control situations, they focus on group relations. They reduce the anxiety and tension of
group members, and thus reduce conflict. They handle creative decision making groups well. They see this
situation as challenging and interesting and perform well in it.

In low control situations, they become absorbed in obtaining group support often at the expense of the
task. Under extremely stressful situations, they may also withdraw from the leadership role, failing to direct the
group’s work.

Task Oriented: (LPC score of 64 and below) Generally, low LPC leaders are more concerned with the task,
and less dependent on group support. They tend to be eager and impatient to get on with the work. They
quickly organize the job and have a no-nonsense attitude about getting the work done.

In moderate control situations, they tend to be anxious and less effective. This situation is often char-
acterized by group conflict, which low LPC leaders do not like to handle. They become absorbed in the task
and pay little attention to personal relations in the group. They tend to be insensitive to the feelings of their
group members, and the group resents the lack of concern.

In high control situations, they tend to relax and to develop pleasant relations with subordinates. They
are easy to get along with. As the work gets done, they do not interfere with the group or expect interference
from their superiors.

In low control situations, they devote themselves to their challenging task. They organize and drive
the group to task completion. They also tend to control the group tightly and maintain strict discipline. Group
members often respect low LPC leaders for enabling them to reach the group’s goals in difficult situations.

LPC scores between 65 and 72: If your score fall into this borderline area, you must carefully analyze your
leadership style as you learn more about the relationship oriented and task oriented styles.


Note: There is no single leadership style that is effective in all situations. Rather, certain leadership styles are
better suited for some situations than for others. Fiedler found that the effectiveness of the leader is
“contingent” upon the orientation of the leader and the favorableness of the situation.

Download
Fiedler's Contingency Theory

 

 

Your download will begin in a moment.
If it doesn't, click here to try again.

Share Fiedler's Contingency Theory to:

Insert your wordpress URL:

example:

http://myblog.wordpress.com/
or
http://myblog.com/

Share Fiedler's Contingency Theory as:

From:

To:

Share Fiedler's Contingency Theory.

Enter two words as shown below. If you cannot read the words, click the refresh icon.

loading

Share Fiedler's Contingency Theory as:

Copy html code above and paste to your web page.

loading