This is not the document you are looking for? Use the search form below to find more!

Report home > Health & Fitness

Healthy Food, Healthy Communities : An Assessment and Scorecard of Community Food Security In the District of Columbia

0.00 (0 votes)
Document Description
Today 35 million Americans including 13 million children are hungry or at risk of hunger. In a country with enormous wealth and abundant agricultural resources we are witnessing a failure of coordination and caring. No person in America has to be hungry. We believe this problem is solvable. In the District of Columbia more than 68,000 residents, including 35,000 children, are living on the edge of hunger. This problem is exacerbated by the paradoxical obesity rates of more than 24 percent and higher than average rates of diabetes, hypertension and other nutrition-related illness plaguing our community. The impact of poor nutrition will be devastating to our communities in the District of Columbia if we don’t act. If we don’t act in a wise fashion and if we don’t act now. The District of Columbia has taken beginning steps to combat the problem of hunger and food insecurity. In 2005, Mayor Anthony A. Williams re-established the Commission on Food and Nutrition. And, with regard to the problem of food insecurity and poor nutrition in children and youth, in April of this year, Mayor Williams and three non-profit organizations – D.C. Hunger Solutions, the Food Research and Action Center, and Share Our Strength – launched a Ten Year Campaign to End Childhood Hunger in the Nation’s Capital. This campaign, endorsed by more than 150 leaders representing over 14 sectors of the city, outlines a plan to improve public education about nutrition resources, strengthen the infrastructure in which programs are administered, and help families help themselves with better information and enhanced economic security.
File Details
  • Added: August, 07th 2009
  • Reads: 1449
  • Downloads: 53
  • File size: 1.02mb
  • Pages: 47
  • Tags: food resources, grocery stores, farmer markets, supplemental food, food security
  • content preview
Submitter
  • Username: shinta
  • Name: shinta
  • Documents: 4332
Embed Code:

Add New Comment




Related Documents

Core Competencies for the Assessment and Management of Individuals at Risk for Suicide

by: samanta, 5 pages

Working with Individuals at-risk for Suicide: Attitudes and Approach 1. Manage one's own reactions to suicide a. Become self-aware of emotional reactions, attitudes, and beliefs related ...

SITUATION ASSESSMENT AND ANALYSIS OF CHILDREN AND WOMEN IN BANGLADESH

by: rosie, 180 pages

The Situation Assessment and Analysis of Children and Women in Bangladesh provides an overview of the situation regarding children's rights to education, health and nutrition, protection from abuse ...

Envisioning a Local Food Economy in the Kansas River Valley (Lawrence, KS)

by: donna, 36 pages

Envisioning a Local Food Economy in the Kansas River Valley (Lawrence, KS)

Total-brain Leadership and Innovation - How to be successful in the knowledge economy

by: manualzon, 14 pages

Self Motivation ebook,NLP ebook,Self Esteem, Motivation and Leadership ebook Total-brain Leadership and Innovation - How to be successful in the knowledge economy.pdf

Martial Arts and Cognitive Psychology: Toward Further Research in the Cognitive Aspects of Martial Arts

by: wilhelm, 13 pages

Psychologists often overlook martial arts as a topic of research. This paper presents evidence that martial arts are sufficiently different from aerobic and anaerobic exercise to warrant a serious ...

Assessment and Treatment of Social Phobia

by: emily, 9 pages

Social phobia is an anxiety disorder characterized by heightened fear and avoidance of one or more social or performance situations, including public speaking, meeting new people, eating or writing ...

Human Health Impact and Regulatory Issues Involving Antimicrobial Resistance in the Food Animal Production Environment

by: Igor, 10 pages

Reports of antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from farms and animal carcasses are raising concerns that antibiotic use in agriculture may play a role in selecting for antibiotic resistance among ...

Deforestation, Growth and Agglomeration Effects : Evidence from Agriculture in the Brazilian Amazo

by: shinta, 21 pages

Population growth and migration have been emphasized as key variables explaining deforestation and land conversion in developing countries. The spatial distribution of human population and ...

Pay An Affordable Price For Conventionality In The Form Of Pen Drive Price

by: indiaplaza, 1 pages

Pen drives have changed the way we work. As, computers have become an essential part of our work, storage and transport of data has risen up to prominence. In the good old days we had floppy discs.

GENDER AND LEADERSHIP STYLE: TRANSFORMATIONALAND TRANSACTIONAL LEADERSHIP IN THE ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH

by: shinta, 22 pages

Gender differences in transformational and transactional leadership style are assessed. Research that explores women's values and their relationship to leadership style is reviewed. ...

Content Preview




Healthy Food,
Healthy Communities:

An Assessment and Scorecard of
Community Food Security
In the District of Columbia



July 2006











- 1 -

Acknowledgements

This assessment and scorecard was prepared and written by Dana Conroy, Emerson Hunger Fellow
and Shana McDavis-Conway, D.C. Hunger Solutions, a project of the Food Research and Action
Center. And, presented to the public by the Mayor’s Commission on Food and Nutrition.

D.C. Hunger Solutions would like to acknowledge and thank the following organizations and
individuals for providing information, analysis, and data:

Food Research and Action Center
Congressional Hunger Center
Community Harvest & the Local Food Alliance
Mayor’s Commission on Food and Nutrition
FreshFarm Markets
Capital Area Food Bank
The Urban Institute
D.C. State Education Office
D.C. Department of Health, Nutrition Services
Garden Resources of Washington (GROW DC)
The Food Trust
Hartford Food System
Community Food Security Coalition
U.S.D.A. Economic Research Service
U.S.D.A. Food & Nutrition Service
Bill Cooper
And residents across the District of Columbia

The work of D.C. Hunger Solutions is made possible by the generous support of the following
supporters:

Cafritz Foundation
Capital One
Case Foundation
Consumer Health Foundation
England Family Foundation
Jewish Youth Philanthropy Institute
Kaiser Permanente
MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger
Moriah Fund
Prince Charitable Trusts
Public Welfare Foundation
Meyer Foundation
Share Our Strength
Sodexho Foundation
Trellis Fund
Weissberg Foundation



1875 Connecticut Ave., NW Suite 540
Washington, DC 20009
(202) 986-2200 x 3020
www.dchunger.org * www.askmehowdc.org

- 2 -

TABLE OF CONTENTS



Page




i.

Executive Summary







4

Major Findings









5

I.

Introduction








6

II.

Analyses of Food Resources in the District of Columbia

Grocery Stores









10
Convenience and Corner Markets







15
Farmer’s Markets









18
Cooperatives and Buying Clubs







23
Community Gardens and Urban Agriculture





26
Federal Nutrition Programs







28
Supplemental Food








30

III.
The Community Food Security Scorecard




32

IV.

Appendix

Appendix A: Map of Poverty in DC…………………..……………………………..……………38
Appendix B: Grocery Stores and Farmers Market Map Information……………………..…..39
Appendix C: Farmer’s Markets- Locations & Schedules…………………..………………..…41
Appendix D: For Further Information…………………..………………………………………...43
Endnotes. ………………………………………………………………………………………..…46








- 3 -

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


Today 35 million Americans including 13 million children are hungry or at risk of hunger. In a
country with enormous wealth and abundant agricultural resources we are witnessing a failure of
coordination and caring. No person in America has to be hungry. We believe this problem is
solvable.
In the District of Columbia more than 68,000 residents, including 35,000 children, are living
on the edge of hunger. This problem is exacerbated by the paradoxical obesity rates of more than 24
percent and higher than average rates of diabetes, hypertension and other nutrition-related illness
plaguing our community. The impact of poor nutrition will be devastating to our communities in the
District of Columbia if we don’t act. If we don’t act in a wise fashion and if we don’t act now.

The District of Columbia has taken beginning steps to combat the problem of hunger and
food insecurity. In 2005, Mayor Anthony A. Williams re-established the Commission on Food and
Nutrition. And, with regard to the problem of food insecurity and poor nutrition in children and youth, in
April of this year, Mayor Williams and three non-profit organizations – D.C. Hunger Solutions, the
Food Research and Action Center, and Share Our Strength – launched a Ten Year Campaign to End
Childhood Hunger in the Nation’s Capital. This campaign, endorsed by more than 150 leaders
representing over 14 sectors of the city, outlines a plan to improve public education about nutrition
resources, strengthen the infrastructure in which programs are administered, and help families help
themselves with better information and enhanced economic security.1

While the ten-year comprehensive plan addresses access to more consistent and better food
for more than 35,000 children and leverages more than $14 million in federal funds to do so, D.C.
Hunger Solutions wanted to take one strategy from the plan, “Increasing families’ access to fresh,
affordable produce”, even further. We decided that our work in this area would be better served by
additional research. Research guided by the principles of community food security.

Community food security (CFS) is a relatively new

food security-promoting strategy that considers all the
What Does Community Food Security
factors within a region or community’s food system that
look like?
influence the availability, cost, and quality of food to area

households,
particularly
those
in
lower
income
Affordable healthy food in all neighborhoods
communities. The food security of individuals, families and

communities impacts every aspect of our society—from
A cohesive network of nutrition programs
the health and well being of citizens to the financial

stability and tax base of City government. By
Low rates of diet-related diseases
acknowledging and examining the interconnectivity of

Safe and nutritious food in stores, assistance
every aspect of a food system, it is much easier to weave
programs and homes
a web of resources that allows every individual to enjoy

access to safe, healthy and affordable food.
Fresh, delicious food for everyone, regardless of
This assessment reviews the current state of
income
access to food and nutrition resources in the District of
Columbia
by
Ward;
and
provides
direction
for
organizations, government and individuals interested in ensuring food security to individuals by
providing better access to healthy and affordable food in every community.
In addition, we ranked each Ward according to the food security of its residents and their
access to affordable healthy food through a variety of resources. The Community Food Security
Scorecard is a snapshot of the current state of local food security in the District of Columbia. We
wanted to know whether residents of every District Ward are able to access healthy and affordable
food.

The major findings of the assessment are:


- 4 -

1.
Grocery stores are not evenly distributed throughout the city. Due to unequal
distribution, not every resident has the advantage of a supermarket in his or her
neighborhood. While Wards 2, & 3 in the Northwestern part of the City have twelve
supermarkets—or one store for every 11,881 residents—Wards 1, 4, 5, 7, and 8 do not
have adequate numbers of stores for their land and population size. For example, only
two chain supermarkets operate east of the river in Wards 7 & 8—an area with over
140,000 people. In Ward 8 there are no chain supermarkets at all.
2.
Many healthy items were not available at every grocery store; and when they were,
they cost more.
At every grocery store in the District we surveyed, foods with high
nutritional value such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and dairy products are more
expensive and more likely to be absent from shelves than less healthy items like frozen
French fries, processed foods, potato chips and soda.
3.
Many corner markets, which low-income communities rely on when there is no
grocery store, have limited affordable, healthy items in stock.
While further research
is needed in this area, one example of five corner markets surveyed found that 3 out of 5
corner markets did not sell chicken; 2 out of 5 did not sell oatmeal, kidney beans, green
peas, and bananas; and eighty percent did not sell or stock oranges and lettuce. It was
also determined that corner markets are the primary food providers in areas of high
poverty, especially in Wards 1, 7, and 8, and that in these stores, food prices are
generally more expensive.
4.
Farmer’s markets are unequally distributed throughout the city and require too
much annual red tape to start-up and keep them going.
There are 18 farmer’s
markets west of the Anacostia river and only 3 east of the river, where there is also a lack
of grocery stores. Also, there is no single farmer’s market permit in the District of
Columbia. Instead, market managers must submit paperwork to multiple D.C.
government agencies— annually.
5.
The District of Columbia overall, is underserved by alternatives such as, grocery
cooperatives, community supported agriculture, and particularly community gardens –
with 80 percent of gardens being concentrated in Upper Northwest and Capitol Hill
neighborhoods.

T
he results of our Community Food Security Scorecard are:


Overall Rankings


Ward 3
B

Ward 6
B-

Ward 2
C+

Ward 4
C+


Ward 5
C

Ward 7
C

Ward 1
C-


Ward 8
D-


Additional information about the findings and the results of the scorecard are detailed in the following
pages. We hope this assessment and scorecard will bring to the forefront the obstacles and barriers
that families face each day trying to obtain healthy food living in the District of Columbia. We urge the
Mayor’s Commission on Food and Nutrition to take on the recommendations outlined in this
assessment and share them with members of the City Council, other elected officials and decision
makers to seek change. All of the recommendations outlined in this assessment are within reason
and can be done within the confines of our current city budget.


- 5 -

INTRODUCTION



Today 35 million Americans including 13 million children are hungry or at risk of hunger.
Hunger and food insecurity (people not experiencing hunger outright, but living on the very edge of
hunger, without adequate resources to purchase a balanced diet for themselves and their families)
are far too widespread in this country and in the District of Columbia. According to the most recent
national data, 21.8 million adults and 13.1 million children live in households that are food insecure or
hungry. Households with children have even more than twice the rate of food insecurity of
households without children.
The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports that the
District has an overall food insecurity rate of 10.2 percent of households.
Food insecurity occurs
D.C. Hunger Solutions estimates nearly 68,000 District residents living in
whenever the availability of
food insecure or hungry households. Child data (for the District of Columbia
nutritionally adequate and safe
food, or the ability to acquire
or states) are not available because of the small sample size, but if the ratio
such food, is limited or
of food insecure children to adults that prevails nationally prevailed in the
uncertain. As a practical
District, approximately 35,000 children here are hungry or food insecure.
matter, it means families can’t

afford a balanced, healthy diet
Food insecurity and hunger are often symptoms of poverty. Families
and may not know where the
next meal is coming from.
are hungry and food insecure when wages and other supports (e.g., child

support payments, cash welfare, housing subsidies) are not adequate to
Hunger is defined as the
meet basic needs. In the last couple of years, the clash of rising health,
more serious situation where
energy and housing costs coupled with stagnant earnings for lower-paid
one or more family members
workers seems to be the cause of the increasing incidence of food insecurity
suffer the uneasy or painful
in the national numbers. Low-income families often pay medical bills and
sensation caused by a
recurrent or involuntary lack
rent first, and find their food costs to be one of the few items in their budget
of food. Over time, hunger
that can be squeezed. Too often, they are squeezed too much.
and food insecurity may result
Given the close connection between inadequate income and hunger,
in malnutrition.
the number of elders living in poverty or near poverty suggests that many
American seniors, too, are at risk of food insecurity and hunger. Non-discretionary financial demands,
such as high health care costs, on many older people may make it difficult to afford adequate food.2
National estimates of food insecurity among older Americans vary. Recent estimates range
from 5.5 percent to 16 percent, due to different survey methodologies and populations studied. 3
There is no available data of food insecure elderly adults in the District of Columbia, but the Capital
Area Food Bank reports that approximately 11 percent of supplemental food clients are senior
citizens.

Poverty Rates by Ward, 2000
40
36
35
30
25
25
22
21
Pove rty
20
19
20
Ra te (%)
15
12
10
7.5
5
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
W a rd

Source: Neighborhood Info DC, Neighborhood Profiles, Council Wards




- 6 -

Food insecurity and hunger bear many consequences. It can prevent children from reaching
their full potential by stunting physical and mental development; and for the elderly, adequate nutrition
is particularly important for health because of their increased vulnerability to disease and conditions
that may impair functionality (the ability to live or cook at home).4 Inadequate diets may contribute to
or exacerbate disease, quicken the advance of age-related degenerative diseases, and delay
recovery from illnesses.5
Individuals who face these conditions have poorer health than their well-fed peers—they get
sick more often, stay sick longer, and are more frequently absent from school, work and other
activities.
These consequences of hunger and food insecurity are not just detrimental to the individual,
but to the neighborhood and community they live in.

Since this assessment approaches the issue of hunger and food insecurity from a community
perspective, we also want to acknowledge the paradox epidemic of overweight and obesity that our
communities are also battling in the District of Columbia. Twenty-four percent of the population in the
District is obese.6 It is not unreasonable to believe that many of the same individuals struggling to
keep food on the table might also be struggling with obesity. When resources are thin, individuals are
more likely to reach for calories instead of nutritional value. Foods high in calories are often less
expensive and easier to obtain in many communities, which we find in this assessment.
According to a white paper written by the Center on Hunger and Poverty and the Food
Research and action Center, The Paradox of Hunger and Obesity in America, a lack of adequate food
resources could result in weight gain in several ways:

The need to maximize caloric intake. One factor that may contribute to the co-
existence of obesity and food insecurity is the need for low-income families to stretch
their food money as far as possible…by maximizing the number of calories they buy
so that their families do not suffer from frequent hunger.

The trade-off between food quantity and quality. …Households reduce food spending
by changing the quality or variety of food consumed before they reduce the quantity
of food eaten.7

Overeating when food is available. …Research indicates that chronic ups and downs
in food availability can cause people to eat more, when food is available, than they
normally would.8

Physiological changes. The body can compensate for periodic food shortages by
becoming more efficient at storing more calories as fat.9




Prevalence (%) of Obesity by Ward in the District of Columbia, 1999-2003

Year
Ward 1
Ward 2
Ward 3
Ward 4
Ward 5
Ward 6
Ward 7
Ward 8
1999
14.4
13.1
7.7
20.5
25.5
17
27.3
25.8
2000
22.7
20.8
9.3
27
29.8
22.9
33.3
31.6
2001
21.8
16.5
7.1
28.6
25.5
22.4
27.9
37.2
2002
22.7
22.9
6.8
20.8
33.1
22.3
39.3
30.6
2003
21.2
10.5
6.6
27.9
23.3
28.6
42
35.8
5 Year
20.6
16.8
7.5
25.0
27.4
22.7
34.0
32.2
Average

Source: DC Agenda, 2004 Issue Scan



- 7 -

Overweight and obesity are important in the discussion of food insecurity and an individual’s
access to food resources. While higher income communities take for granted to abundance of healthy
food resources at their fingertips, many individuals living in low-income communities don’t always
have sufficient access to food that is high in nutritional value. Even if they want to eat well, they may
have to overcome significant barriers within their community to do so.


What is Community Food Security?

Mark Winne, founder of Hartford Food System and widely regarded as an expert on food
insecurity, defines community food security (CFS) as a relatively new food security-promoting
strategy that considers all the factors within a region or community’s food system that influence the
availability, cost, and quality of food to area households, particularly those in lower income
communities. The food security of individuals, families and communities impacts every aspect of our
society—from the health and well being of citizens to the
financial stability and tax base of City government. By
acknowledging and examining the interconnectivity of

every aspect of a food system, it is much easier to
What Does Community Food Security
weave a web of resources that allows every individual to
look like?
enjoy access to safe, healthy and affordable food. Since

community food security is a holistic approach, focused
Affordable healthy food in all neighborhoods
on regional and local food systems, it is concerned with

the full range and interdependency of food chain events
A cohesive network of nutrition programs
including agriculture, the availability of supermarkets and

other affordable outlets for quality food, the involvement
Low rates of diet-related diseases
of the wider citizenry and local and state governments in

seeking solutions to food insecurity, sufficient and
Safe and nutritious food in stores, assistance
sustainable personal and business income and the
programs and homes
services and environments that encourage healthy food

choices including schools, nutrition service providers,
Fresh, delicious food for everyone, regardless of
and commercial food operations.
income


In order to continue addressing food insecurity in
individuals, D.C. Hunger Solutions believes we should
have a better understanding of what food resources are available to individuals and families in their
neighborhoods – in their communities. This assessment reviews the current state of access to food
and nutrition resources in the District of Columbia by Ward; and provides direction for organizations,
government and individuals interested in ensuring food security of District residents by providing
better access to healthy and affordable food in every community.


About this Assessment

This assessment examines the current state of access to food and nutrition resources in the
District of Columbia using primary data sources, statistics, and interviews. We provide direction for
government, individuals, and organizations interested in ensuring access to healthy and affordable
food in every community through the following major food resources:

Primary Food Sources in the District of Columbia

Grocery Stores
Convenience & Corner Stores
Farmer’s Markets
Grocery Cooperatives Buying Clubs

- 8 -

Community Gardens
Federal Nutrition Programs
Supplemental Food

In addition to analyzing the distribution and access to those resources, we selected health, nutrition
and economic indicators to provide a complete picture of the food security of each Ward in the
District.

Additional Indicators of Food Security


Poverty rates
Obesity rates

We ranked each Ward based on these indicators and access to food resources in relation to
population or need. For example, we used the ratio of grocery stores to total Ward population to
determine access to grocery stores. While we used access to summer nutrition programs as an
indicator of food security, the assessment gives only limited recommendations on using federal
nutrition programs to increase the food security of the District residents. For more information and
recommendations on the Federal Nutrition programs, please see “Ending Childhood Hunger in the
Nation’s Capital” at www.askmehowdc.org.

Grocery Store Survey Methodology

As part of this assessment, we conducted a price and product availability survey of retailers
in the District of Columbia. Stores surveyed included national and regional chain supermarkets
including Safeway, Giant, Whole Foods, and Super Fresh; discount grocers like Murray’s, and
independent stores such as Anacostia Supermarket Warehouse and Bestway Market. While
generally in this assessment, “grocery stores” are defined as regional or national chain supermarkets
and grocers, for the purposes of this survey, “grocery stores” includes all of the above.

Due to temporary closings and non-participation by some stores, we were unable to survey
every grocer in the District. However, in total, volunteers and staff surveyed thirty grocery stores in
the city. For comparison, we surveyed two chain supermarkets just outside the District, in Marlow
Heights, Maryland and Arlington, Virginia. The survey priced 52 common food items such as rice,
milk, apples, carrots, frozen french fries and soda in standard quantities. We used the lowest price
available of the standard quantity in any brand, including sale prices when applicable. In order to
minimize the impact of changes in sale prices, all surveys were conducted during a 48 hour period in
January 2006. Therefore, this survey provides only a snapshot of price and availability and is not
meant to reflect the average normal prices of any particular store.















- 9 -

GROCERY STORES




Why are grocery stores an important solution in ending hunger
and providing better nutrition to individuals in the community?

We all rely on grocery stores and supermarkets to purchase our food – staples, produce, and many
other routine items to get us through. These much-needed markets are the cornerstone of a
community and can tell us a lot about the food security of the individuals its serves. As such,
disparities in access to well-stocked grocery stores reverberate in both expected and unexpected
ways. The district has about half of the average number of grocery stores for an area its size.10
Previous studies show that neighborhoods that lack a supermarket have higher rates of diabetes,
hypertension and obesity.

Despite ample evidence that low-income neighborhoods are a profitable and untapped market,
research proves a strong correlation between poverty, race and a lack of grocery stores. Even when
residents have the economic resources to purchase food, they cannot easily access markets for
shopping. In addition, the local economic impact of food stamp participation or usage increases are
diluted when residents are forced to leave the district to shop.


Here’s what we found during our assessment of grocery stores in
the District of Columbia.



Grocery stores are not evenly distributed through out the city.

The average family of three spends $6,385 per year on food expenditures.11 With the District’s dense
population, this equates to a large market for food retailers. The District of Columbia hosts twenty-
three major chain grocery stores, or one supermarket for nearly every 25,000 residents—four Giants,
three Whole Foods, and sixteen Safeways. Unfortunately, due to unequal distribution, not every
resident has the advantage of a grocery store in their neighborhood. While Wards 2, & 3 in the
Northwestern part of the City have twelve grocery stores—or one store for every 11,882 residents—
Wards 1, 4, 5, 7, and 8 do not have adequate numbers of stores for their land and population size.
For example, only two chain grocery stores operate east of the river in Wards 7 & 8—an area with
over 140,000 people. In Ward 8 there are no chain grocery stores at all.12 Other smaller grocers,
convenience stores, and carry-outs sell food in Wards 7 & 8, but many of these stores have high
prices and a limited selection of staple groceries and healthier foods.

There are plans to build a new $37 million, 63,000 square foot Giant in Ward 8 on the old Camp
Simms National Guard site on Alabama Ave SE.13 However, when the additional supermarket opens
Ward 8 will still have only one supermarket for nearly 71,000 people. It is not surprising that the chair
of the Advisory Neighborhood Commission 8E, Sandra Seegars, reports that many residents often go
outside of District lines to Maryland to do their shopping.14 As a result, not only are Ward 8 residents
forced to incur considerable transportation costs or buy food at small high-cost retailers, but the City
is losing consumer revenue that would most likely stay within District lines if grocery stores existed in
the ward.

The struggle of life without a grocery store is most acutely experienced in both neighborhoods with
many low-income residents and communities of color. Wards 5, 6, 7, and 8 are home to some of the
District’s largest populations of residents in poverty, yet these areas contain few grocery stores. An

- 10 -

Download
Healthy Food, Healthy Communities : An Assessment and Scorecard of Community Food Security In the District of Columbia

 

 

Your download will begin in a moment.
If it doesn't, click here to try again.

Share Healthy Food, Healthy Communities : An Assessment and Scorecard of Community Food Security In the District of Columbia to:

Insert your wordpress URL:

example:

http://myblog.wordpress.com/
or
http://myblog.com/

Share Healthy Food, Healthy Communities : An Assessment and Scorecard of Community Food Security In the District of Columbia as:

From:

To:

Share Healthy Food, Healthy Communities : An Assessment and Scorecard of Community Food Security In the District of Columbia.

Enter two words as shown below. If you cannot read the words, click the refresh icon.

loading

Share Healthy Food, Healthy Communities : An Assessment and Scorecard of Community Food Security In the District of Columbia as:

Copy html code above and paste to your web page.

loading