This is not the document you are looking for? Use the search form below to find more!

Report home > Others

National Synthetic Drugs Action Plan

0.00 (0 votes)
Document Description
The United States faces an array of drugs of abuse. Many, such as cocaine, heroin, and marijuana have confronted us for decades. We have developed programs and initiatives to combat these drugs—to prevent use, treat the addicted, and disrupt production and the marketplace for drugs. The significant threat to the nation posed by synthetic drugs, especially methamphetamine and MDMA, or “Ecstasy,” is a more recent phenomenon. Initial efforts to confront synthetic drugs are already showing results. As demonstrated by the findings of the most recent National Survey on Drug Use and Health (formerly known as the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) and the 2003 Monitoring the Future study, when we collectively push back, the synthetic drugs threat also will decline.
File Details
  • Added: October, 08th 2010
  • Reads: 391
  • Downloads: 1
  • File size: 1.41mb
  • Pages: 74
  • Tags: drugs, prevention, treatment
  • content preview
Submitter
  • Name: etoile
Embed Code:

Add New Comment




Related Documents

Social Media Action Plan Template

by: jayden, 3 pages

Social Media Action Plan Tie Social Media to Your Business Goals Business Drivers Goals Financial • Revenue • Expenses • ...

Social Media Action Plan Template

by: rebeka, 3 pages

Social Media Action Plan Tie Social Media to Your Business Goals Business Drivers Goals Financial • Revenue • Expenses • ...

Action Plan For Goal Setting

by: bailey, 5 pages

Goal Setting Formula: 5 Tips For Your Action Plan For Goal Setting Goal Setting Formula: How To Set And Achieve Your Goals Like A Winner 5 Tips For Your Action…

action plan national recovery haiti

by: juliana, 57 pages

word document

Action Plan for Age and Economy - Edinburgh

by: shinta, 26 pages

Since the census of 2001, the Scottish Government and leading academics in Scotland have expressed concern over the falling number of births in Scotland and the ageing and decline of the ...

Leading by Example: An Action Plan for Green Buildings in Massachusetts State Construction Projects

by: shinta, 50 pages

The Massachusetts Sustainable Design Roundtable (the "Roundtable") is a voluntary, public-private partnership of more than 70 high-level professionals involved in the design and ...

Health and Safety Action Plan

by: glover07, 1 pages

Health and Safety action plan.

JPA’s Committed Action Plan on Environment

by: lakesha, 6 pages

Currently, we are facing the environmental problems as typified by global warming problems. Unlike the past pollution problems, these problems, caused by a wide variety of activities including our ...

Action Plan for Assistance for Paulding, Ga

by: facunda, 10 pages

Action Plan for Assistance for Paulding, Ga

Land Rover Footwear Brand Action Plan

by: frej, 38 pages

Land Rover Footwear Brand Action Plan

Content Preview
NATIONAL 
SYNTHETIC DRUGS
ACTION PLAN
The Federal Government Response to the
Production, Trafficking, and Abuse of Synthetic
Drugs and Diverted Pharmaceutical Products

NATIONAL
SYNTHETIC DRUGS
ACTION PLAN
The Federal Government Response to the
Production, Trafficking, and Abuse of Synthetic
Drugs and Diverted Pharmaceutical Products

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY
Washington, D. C.  20503
October 2004
The United States faces an array of drugs of abuse.  Many, such as cocaine, heroin, and
marijuana have confronted us for decades.  We have developed programs and initiatives
to combat these drugs—to prevent use, treat the addicted, and disrupt production and 
the marketplace for drugs.  The significant threat to the nation posed by synthetic drugs,
especially methamphetamine and MDMA, or “Ecstasy,” is a more recent phenomenon.
Initial efforts to confront synthetic drugs are already showing results.  As demonstrated
by the findings of the most recent National Survey on Drug Use and Health (formerly
known as the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) and the 2003 Monitoring the
Future study, when we collectively push back, the synthetic drugs threat also will decline.
A related threat is the growth in nonmedical use of pharmaceutical controlled substances.
Diversion of these legitimate drugs is fueled in part by easy access over the Internet.  The
most recent NSDUH and other data indicate that we continue to confront increased use of
such drugs, notably pain relievers and tranquilizers.  This document recommends some
new approaches to address this challenge.
This Action Plan is designed both to convey the seriousness of the challenges posed by
synthetic drugs and diverted pharmaceuticals and to outline specific steps the federal
government will take in the future to capitalize on recent successes and accelerate our
national efforts against these harmful substances.  Through the recommendations in this
Action Plan and with the active engagement of our partners in state and local govern­
ment, we intend to move aggressively in the coming years.  To facilitate follow­up, this
Action Plan creates a high­level interagency working group to ensure that these recom­
mendations are implemented as effectively and rapidly as possible.    
This document is a product of the hard work of the Department of Justice Criminal
Division’s Narcotic and Dangerous Drug Section, in cooperation with the Drug
Enforcement Administration and several other agencies, and in consultation with various
components of the Department of Health and Human Services.  We are grateful for their
efforts.  The Action Plan represents an important step forward in our nation’s effort to
control dangerous synthetic drugs and pharmaceutical products and, moreover, in the
continued achievement of the objectives set forth in the President’s National Drug
Control Strategy.
John P. Walters
John Ashcroft
Director
Attorney General
Office of National Drug Control Policy

Table of Contents
I. Overview
A. Introduction.........................................................................................................................................................1
B. Plan for Implementation of Recommendations...............................................................................................2
C. List of Recommendations ..................................................................................................................................3
1. Prevention .....................................................................................................................................................3
2. Treatment ......................................................................................................................................................4
3. Regulation of Chemicals and Drugs............................................................................................................4
4. Law Enforcement..........................................................................................................................................6
II. Nature of the Problem ...............................................................................................................................................11
A. Consumption Trends ........................................................................................................................................11
1. Methamphetamine .....................................................................................................................................11
2. MDMA/Ecstasy ...........................................................................................................................................14
3. Other Club Drugs........................................................................................................................................16
4. Other Synthetic Drugs and Diverted Pharmaceuticals ...........................................................................17
B. Trafficking Trends ..............................................................................................................................................19
1. Methamphetamine .....................................................................................................................................19
2. MDMA/Ecstasy ...........................................................................................................................................23
3. Other Club Drugs........................................................................................................................................24
4. Other Synthetic Drugs and Diverted Pharmaceuticals ...........................................................................25
III. Response to the Problem .........................................................................................................................................27
A. Prevention..........................................................................................................................................................27
1. Current Efforts.............................................................................................................................................27
2. Recommendations......................................................................................................................................29
B. Treatment ...........................................................................................................................................................30
1. Current Efforts.............................................................................................................................................30
2. Recommendations......................................................................................................................................31
C. Regulation of Chemicals and Drugs................................................................................................................31
1. Current Efforts.............................................................................................................................................31
a. Introduction .........................................................................................................................................31
b. U.S. Chemical Controls .......................................................................................................................33
c. The International Challenge ...............................................................................................................35
d. Chemical Control Results....................................................................................................................37
e. Control of OxyContin and Other Diverted Pharmaceutical Products.............................................38
2. Recommendations......................................................................................................................................39
D. Law Enforcement ..............................................................................................................................................41
1. Current Efforts.............................................................................................................................................41
a. Methamphetamine: Planning and Coordination..............................................................................41
b. MDMA: Planning and Coordination ..................................................................................................42
c. Training .................................................................................................................................................43
d. Seizures, Investigations, and Prosecutions .......................................................................................43
2. Recommendations......................................................................................................................................44
Appendices
A. Outline of an Early Warning and Response System for Emerging Drugs of Abuse .....................................49
B. Overview of the New Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) System Design & Implementation............53
C. DEA Action Plan to Prevent the Diversion and Abuse of OxyContin ...........................................................55
D. Schedules and Regulatory Controls Applicable to the Subject Controlled Substances .............................59
E. Sentencing .........................................................................................................................................................63
F. Examples of Notable State Laws with Respect to Precursor Chemical Control ...........................................67

NATIONAL SYNTHETIC DRUGS ACTION PLAN
I. Overview
A. Introduction
The illicit production of synthetic drugs is hardly a new problem in this country.  For years,
community leaders and law enforcement officials have understood the threat and expressed con­
cern for the future based on the potential dangers of these drugs.  
That uncertain future is now a disturbing reality.  In the past five years, the use of synthetic
drugs has climbed dramatically, a fact that lends urgency to the effort to control them.  Recent
drug­consumption studies indicate that substantial numbers of Americans are using these harm­
ful substances.  While the use of MDMA has fallen off significantly among young people in the last
two years, its use remains at unacceptable levels.  The gradual expansion in the use of metham­
phetamine may be continuing as well.  These two drugs pose the most significant synthetic drug
threats to the nation.
The expansion in the demand for these drugs is not limited to the United States.  Several coun­
tries in Europe and Asia are similarly challenged by the spread of the synthetic drug trade.
Encouraged and emboldened by the growing global demand for these drugs, traffickers are
exploiting every available opportunity to produce, export, and market a wide variety of synthetic
drugs.  A large volume of precursor chemicals and synthetic drugs produced overseas is now
smuggled into the United States to support domestic production and distribution as well. 
The purpose of this document is to provide a blueprint for action under the President’s
National Drug Control Strategy that brings together the various strands of domestic and interna­
tional efforts into a coherent plan for attacking and disrupting the trade in these dangerous drugs.
This Action Plan focuses on illicitly manufactured synthetic drugs, including methamphetamine,
amphetamine, MDMA, GHB, PCP, and LSD, which are not of primarily organic origin.  It also dis­
cusses selected pharmaceutical products which are sometimes diverted from legitimate com­
merce, such as ketamine and oxycodone (particularly in the form of OxyContin), and the illegally
imported depressant flunitrazepam (trade name Rohypnol).  Regardless of the venues in which
they are used, the problems posed by licitly produced pharmaceutical products are distinct from
those pertaining to clandestinely produced drugs, and the approaches to prevent their illegal traf­
ficking likewise vary. 
Methamphetamine is the most widely used and clandestinely produced synthetic drug in the
United States and, thus, receives the most attention in this Action Plan.  Although methampheta­
mine is manufactured licitly for medical purposes, the vast majority of illegally trafficked
methamphetamine is produced illegally in laboratories both here and abroad.  The related syn­
thetic stimulant amphetamine is typically trafficked interchangeably with methamphetamine and
produced clandestinely by a similar process, and it has a similar effect on users.  
While all of the drugs discussed in this paper are significant drugs of abuse, some of these sub­
stances—namely MDMA (“Ecstasy”), GHB, Rohypnol, and ketamine—are distinguished as “club
drugs” because they are commonly encountered at nightclubs and late­night dance parties called
1
“raves” or “circuit parties.” MDMA (3,4­methylenedioxymeth­amphetamine) is a stimulant with
1

NATIONAL SYNTHETIC DRUGS ACTION PLAN
hallucinogenic properties that has surged in use in recent years.  Gamma hydroxybutyric acid (GHB)
and Rohypnol are depressants which are often used to incapacitate victims in sexual assaults; the
2
instances of GHB use are increasing, while trafficking in Rohypnol appears to be decreasing.
Ketamine is a dissociative anesthetic which has also become popular among rave and circuit party
attendees.  Furthermore, there is a virtual alphabet soup of “designer drugs” that are not frequently
encountered by law enforcement, but which may proliferate at raves and other youth­oriented set­
tings at any time.
Additionally, the use of synthetic opiates, especially oxycodone, is growing, and the dissociative
anesthetic phencyclidine (PCP) is still being used.  The hallucinogen lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD)
has seen major declines in youth use—to the lowest levels since surveys began in 1975.  None of these
drugs, however, is commonly associated with raves and circuit parties.  
Synthetic drugs not only harm the bodies and minds of those who use them, they also threaten
human health through the damage they inflict on the environment.  For example, the process of mak­
ing methamphetamine requires the use of hazardous chemicals, many of them flammable, corrosive,
or explosive.  Moreover, methamphetamine is made primarily by unscrupulous chemists, often oper­
ating in makeshift labs, with little regard for public safety or environmental health.
Methamphetamine labs produce toxic byproducts that commonly end up in fields, public parks, and
3
waterways.  Some of these chemicals can cause disfigurement, illness, or even death on contact.
As discussed in the National Drug Control Strategy, synthetic drugs by their very nature present
special challenges to the agencies and organizations working to stop them.  Because the drugs are
made in laboratories and not harvested from fields, there are no crops to eradicate as in the cases of
marijuana, heroin, and cocaine.  Instead, supply reduction efforts must focus on limiting access to
precursor chemicals, shutting down illegal labs, and breaking up organized criminal groups that man­
ufacture and distribute the drugs.  We need to strengthen international and domestic law enforce­
ment mechanisms, emphasizing informal, flexible, and rapid communications at the operational
level.  Like the traffickers who fuel the market, we must ourselves become more nimble, developing
policies and methods that allow us to adapt quickly and seize every opportunity to disrupt the trade. 
This Action Plan begins with a general outline of demand and trafficking trends with respect to the
drugs highlighted above.  Next, it discusses the status of prevention, treatment, regulatory and law
enforcement efforts, and provides recommendations for future actions in each of these areas.  The
Action Plan also includes six appendices.  Appendix A is a proposed outline for an early warning and
response system to identify and address the impact of emerging drugs of abuse.  Appendix B provides
an overview of the new Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) system design and implementation
plans.  Appendix C is a Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Action Plan to Prevent the Diversion
and Abuse of OxyContin.  Appendix D outlines the schedules and regulatory measures that apply to
the subject controlled substances and their chemical precursors.  Appendix E summarizes the appli­
cable sentencing guidelines.  Appendix F summarizes precursor chemical control laws in Missouri
and Oklahoma.
B. Plan for Implementation of Recommendations
Overarching responsibility for implementing the recommendations in this Action Plan will reside
in a new Synthetic Drugs Interagency Working Group (SD­IWG), to be co­chaired by the Office of
National Drug Control Policy and the Department of Justice.  The SD­IWG can, at the discretion of
2

NATIONAL SYNTHETIC DRUGS ACTION PLAN
the co­chairs, refer recommendations to other pre­existing government working groups.  The SD­IWG
will meet within 30 days of the publication of this report, and thereafter on an as­needed basis.  The
group will submit a written implementation update to the Director of the Office of National Drug
Control Policy and the Attorney General six months after publication of this Action Plan.  
C. List of Recommendations
1. Prevention
Develop an Early Warning and Response System ­ ( NDIC, DOJ, HHS, ONDCP )
Establish a comprehensive, interagency, early warning and response system to detect the emergence
of new drugs and trends.  Appendix A lays out the possible parameters of such a system in detail, but
it should include increased research efforts to develop and disseminate accurate, reliable, and cost­
effective tests for identifying new synthetic drug use trends.  Particular focus should be given to earli­
er identification and routine detection of licitly produced drugs with high illicit use potential. 
Enhance Public Outreach Efforts Focusing on Synthetic Drugs ­ ( SAMSHA, DOJ, ONDCP )
Develop a multimedia education campaign on the consumption of synthetic drugs, focusing initially
on methamphetamine.  The program should, as appropriate, incorporate messages about the envi­
ronmental threat and risks to children from clandestine labs.  Ensure adequate dissemination of all
pertinent materials and information on synthetic drugs through the Department of Education’s Office
of Safe and Drug­Free Schools. 
Improve Education and Training on Pharmaceuticals ­ ( DEA, FDA, SAMHSA, ONDCP )
Ensure product labeling that clearly articulates conditions for the safe and effective use of controlled
substances, including full disclosure of safety issues associated with pharmaceuticals.  Develop a
mechanism for the wider dissemination and completion of approved Continuing Medical Education
courses for physicians who prescribe controlled substances.  Develop Internet public service
announcements regarding the potential dangers and illegality of online direct purchase of controlled
substances. 
Develop Best Practices to Assist Drug­Endangered Children ­ (HHS, EPA, DOJ, DEA, ONDCP)
Develop protocols for assisting drug­endangered children that generally address staff training; roles
and responsibilities of intervening agencies; appropriate reporting, cross reporting, information shar­
ing, and confidentiality; safety procedures for children, families, and responding personnel; inter­
viewing procedures; evidence collection and preservation procedures; medical care procedures; and
community resource development.
Research and Develop Targeted Prevention Programs ­ ( NIDA, ONDCP )
Support research on the initiation of methamphetamine use and the progression of use leading to
addiction.  Programs should be developed to target high­risk groups or communities and to increase
community involvement in prevention efforts.
Improve Data on Afflicted Geographic Areas ­ ( NDIC, SAMHSA, DOJ, ONDCP )
Build on existing Geographical Information System (GIS) resources and databases to integrate feder­
ally mandated drug test results, crime laboratory evidence analysis, population demographics, and
3

NATIONAL SYNTHETIC DRUGS ACTION PLAN
other meaningful data pertaining to synthetic drugs and diverted pharmaceuticals in a manner that
supports geographically based prevention and intervention efforts.
Examine the Use of Prescription Narcotics ­ ( NIDA, SAMHSA, FDA, NIJ, DEA )
Assess the scope and magnitude of the licit and illicit use of prescription narcotic analgesics, in par­
ticular OxyContin, including the pursuit of additional data sources in cooperation with the Food and
Drug Administration (FDA), the National Institute for Justice (NIJ), private entities, and others. 
2. Treatment
Increase Treatment Capacity ­ ( HHS )
Assess treatment needs for synthetic and diverted pharmaceutical drug addiction and, if necessary,
expand that capacity in the community and in correctional facilities.  Particular emphasis should be
given to the development of additional treatment capacity for methamphetamine users, to include
follow­up services that address the protracted recovery period associated with methamphetamine
dependency.  
Research Treatment for Synthetic Drug Abuse ­ ( HHS, NIDA, SAMHSA, ONDCP)
Increase research on the physical and psychological effects of methamphetamine and other synthet­
ic drugs, as well as on the development of effective treatment protocols for synthetic drugs. 
Develop Guidelines for Juvenile Drug Treatment ­ ( NIDA, SAMHSA )
Fund research on and pursue the development of guidelines with respect to the treatment of juve­
niles, who often are not adequately served in existing drug treatment programs designed for adults. 
Develop Early Response Treatment Protocols ­ ( NIDA, SAMHSA )
Develop and disseminate early­response protocols addressing requests for treatment of dependency
on emerging synthetic drugs and diverted pharmaceuticals.
Study Options for Criminal Justice System Treatment ­ ( NIDA, SAMHSA, NIJ )
Invest in additional studies on the efficacy of various comprehensive treatment programs for syn­
thetic drug abuse and on their adaptability to diverse individual and community needs, especially
those unique to the criminal justice system.
Expand Dissemination of Treatment Best Practices ­ ( NIDA, SAMHSA, ONDCP, DEA )
Expand capabilities to disseminate pertinent research results and best­practices training techniques
as part of the overall effort to increase access to effective treatments for dependencies on synthetic
and diverted pharmaceutical drugs.
3. Regulation of Chemicals and Drugs
Support Stronger State Controls on Precursor Chemicals ­ ( DOJ, ONDCP, DEA )
States that face significant levels of clandestine lab activity and chemical diversion are urged to con­
sider the imposition of more stringent controls than those currently in place at the federal level.
Several states, notably Oklahoma, have recently enacted strict retail­level controls.  (See Appendix
F).  Additional state­level controls could include, for example: allowing only licensed pharmacists
and pharmacy technicians to sell products containing precursor chemicals; placing such products
behind the sales counter and/or in a locked display case; purchase limits imposed on a transaction
4

NATIONAL SYNTHETIC DRUGS ACTION PLAN
and/or monthly basis (with an appropriate tracking mechanism); and requirements of customer iden­
tification sales record keeping.  
Remove the Blister Pack Exemption ­ ( DEA, DOJ )
Support legislation that removes the blister pack exemption and eliminates distinctions based on the
form of packaging, as recommended in DEA’s November 2001 report to Congress. 
Regulate Chemical Spot Market ­ ( DEA, DOJ )
As an extension of existing authority over imports, law enforcement should seek the legislative author­
ity to regulate sales of bulk chemicals on the domestic spot market by notification and approval of any
deviations in quantity or customer from the import declaration.   
Determine Licit Chemical Needs ­ ( DEA, DOJ, ONDCP )
In cooperation with industry, commission a statistical analysis to estimate the legitimate needs for
pseudoephedrine and ephedrine products—including combination products such as ephedrine with
guaifenesin—both nationwide and regionally.
Enable Import Controls on Bulk Ephedrine and Pseudoephedrine ­ ( DEA, DOJ, ONDCP )
Seek legislation that would treat the post­importation handling of bulk ephedrine and bulk pseu­
doephedrine in a similar manner, for regulatory purposes, as federal laws now treat the post­importa­
tion processing of Schedule I and II controlled substances.  Impose such controls on these critical 
precursors as are needed to limit imports to those necessary for legitimate commercial needs and for
maintenance of effective control over chemical diversion.
Limit Online Chemical Sales ­ ( DEA, DOJ )
Continue ongoing efforts to advise the owners and operators of major on­line auction websites of the
use of precursor chemicals in clandestine labs, and urge them to consider banning the sale of precur­
sor chemicals over their websites. 
Strengthen Cooperation with Mexico ­ ( DEA, DOJ, State, ONDCP )
Solidify significant recent advancements by Mexico to increase the effectiveness of bilateral chemical
control with the United States through continued partnership and meetings with the pertinent
Mexican components, including their drug intelligence center (CENAPI), the Federal Investigative
Agency (AFI), the chemical regulatory entity in the Ministry of Health (COFEPRIS), and the Health
Commission. 
Enhance Coordination and Information Exchange with Canada ­ ( DHS, ICE, CPB, DEA )
Enhance ongoing coordination with Canada Customs and Revenue Agency on border detection, tar­
geting, and interdiction efforts, and ensure appropriate focus by Canada­U.S. joint Integrated Border
Enforcement Teams on the precursor chemical and synthetic drug threats.  Further expand the ongo­
ing exchange of information concerning Canadian businesses involved in the importation, produc­
tion, and distribution of pseudoephedrine—particularly those firms whose products have frequently
been diverted or smuggled into the United States.
Strengthen the Multilateral Chemical Control System ­ ( DEA, DOJ, State, ONDCP ) 
Garner international support for making existing multilateral chemical controls more universal, for­
mal, and well­supported by international institutions, including UN bodies such as the International
5

NATIONAL SYNTHETIC DRUGS ACTION PLAN
Narcotics Control Board and regional bodies such as the Organization of American States’ Inter­
American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD).  Work to realize the full potential of Project
PRISM, and build support for the application of the 1988 UN Convention to pharmaceutical prepara­
tions containing precursor chemicals that can be easily recovered for use in illicit drug production.
Exchange Information with Chemical Producing Countries ­ ( DEA, DHS, State, USTR )
Continue ongoing information­sharing efforts with the countries that produce precursor chemicals
used to make amphetamine­type stimulants, particularly China, India, Germany, and the Czech
Republic. 
Educate Store Employees ­ ( DEA, DOJ )
Building on efforts begun in a number of states, work to develop a model training program for phar­
macists, retail management, and store employees concerning suspicious pseudoephedrine purchas­
es, as well as suspicious sales of chemicals and items used in the manufacture of methamphetamine.
Encourage Voluntary Controls by Retail Pharmacies and Stores ­ ( DEA, DOJ, ONDCP )
Seek the voluntary participation of major retail chains in programs to control pseudoephedrine 
products through restrictions on the quantity that can be purchased at a single time.  Also support
the voluntary movement of pseudoephedrine products from stores’ open shelves to behind pharmacy
counters or other manned counters in retail settings where pharmacies are not on site.
Work with Manufacturers to Reformulate Abused Pharmaceutical Products ­ ( DEA, FDA )
Continue to support the efforts of firms that manufacture frequently diverted pharmaceutical prod­
ucts to reformulate their products so as to reduce diversion and abuse.  Encourage manufacturers to
explore methods to render products containing key precursors such as pseudoephedrine ineffective
in the clandestine production of methamphetamine and pain control products such as OxyContin
less suitable for snorting or injection.
Support State Prescription Monitoring Programs ­ ( DEA, ONDCP )
Support states’ creation of prescription monitoring programs designed to detect inappropriate pre­
scribing patterns and prescription fraud.  Law enforcement and regulatory entities should have
access to information in case of apparent diversion or inappropriate prescribing of controlled sub­
stances, and some provision for state­to­state communication of adverse information should be
examined.  Supporting legislation should be explored.  
4. Law Enforcement
Target Pseudoephedrine and Iodine Smuggling to and from Mexico ­ ( DEA, ICE, CBP )
Focus law enforcement resources on stopping the recently­noted flow of suspicious shipments of pre­
cursor chemicals, notably pseudoephedrine, from Asia to Mexico, apparently destined for clandestine
methamphetamine labs in Mexico and the United States.  Also focus on the smuggling of iodine from
Mexico.  In all such cases, law enforcement should identify and aggressively pursue the persons and
firms responsible. 
Focus on Canadian Synthetics and Chemical Smugglers ­ ( DEA, ICE, DOJ )
Expand joint U.S.­Canadian investigations into the smuggling of chemicals, methamphetamine,
MDMA, and other club drugs and diverted pharmaceuticals.  Assign high priority to investigations of
6

Download
National Synthetic Drugs Action Plan

 

 

Your download will begin in a moment.
If it doesn't, click here to try again.

Share National Synthetic Drugs Action Plan to:

Insert your wordpress URL:

example:

http://myblog.wordpress.com/
or
http://myblog.com/

Share National Synthetic Drugs Action Plan as:

From:

To:

Share National Synthetic Drugs Action Plan.

Enter two words as shown below. If you cannot read the words, click the refresh icon.

loading

Share National Synthetic Drugs Action Plan as:

Copy html code above and paste to your web page.

loading