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OJJDP FY 2010 Youth with Sexual Behavior Problems Program

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U.S. Department of Justice OMB No. 1121-0329 Office of Justice Programs Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), Office of Justice Programs (OJP), Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) is seeking applications for funding under its Youth with Sexual Behavior Problems Program. This program furthers DOJ's mission by supporting states and communities in their efforts to develop, enhance, and implement effective treatment programs for child victims; improve the juvenile justice system; and protect children from victimization and exploitation. OJJDP FY 2010 Youth with Sexual Behavior Problems Program Eligibility Under Part A of this solicitation, eligible applicants are limited to public agencies, including state agencies, units of local government (including federally-recognized Indian tribal governments as determined by the Secretary of the Interior and published in the Federal Register), public universities and colleges (including tribal institutions of higher education), and private nonprofit organizations (including faith-based, tribal, and community organizations). Under Part B of this solicitation, applicants are limited to public college and universities and private nonprofit organizations (including faith- and community-based organizations).
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U.S. Department of Justice
OMB No. 1121-0329
Office of Justice Programs
Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), Office of Justice Programs (OJP), Office of Juvenile
Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) is seeking applications for funding under its Youth
with Sexual Behavior Problems Program. This program furthers DOJ’s mission by supporting
states and communities in their efforts to develop, enhance, and implement effective treatment
programs for child victims; improve the juvenile justice system; and protect children from
victimization and exploitation.
OJJDP FY 2010 Youth with Sexual
Behavior Problems Program
Eligibility
Under Part A of this solicitation, eligible applicants are limited to public agencies, including state
agencies, units of local government (including federally-recognized Indian tribal governments as
determined by the Secretary of the Interior and published in the Federal Register), public
universities and colleges (including tribal institutions of higher education), and private nonprofit
organizations (including faith-based, tribal, and community organizations). Under Part B of this
solicitation, applicants are limited to public college and universities and private nonprofit
organizations (including faith- and community-based organizations). See “Eligibility,” page 3.
Deadline
Registration with Grants.gov is required prior to application submission. (See “How To Apply,”
page 11.) All applications are due by 8 p.m., Eastern Time, on Monday, June 28, 2010. (See
“Deadlines: Registration and Application,” page 3.)
Contact Information
For technical assistance with submitting an application, call the Grants.gov Customer Support
Hotline at 1-800-518-4726 or e-mail support@grants.gov. Grants.gov Support Hotline hours of
operation are 24 hours, seven days a week, except federal holidays.
For assistance with any other requirement of this solicitation, call Will Bronson, Program
Manager, at 202-305-2427 or contact him by e-mail at willie.bronson@usdoj.gov.
Grants.Gov number assigned to announcement: OJJDP -2010-2719 for Part A and
OJJDP -2010-2718 for Part B.
1

CONTENTS
Overview……………………………………………………………………….…………………………3
Deadlines: Registration and Application………………………………………………………………3
Eligibility………………………………………………………………………………………………….3
Program-Specific Information…………………………………………………..………………………4
Performance Measures………………………………………………………………..……………….9
How To Apply……………………………………………………………………..……………………11
What an Application Is Expected To Include…………………………………………………………12
Standard
Form-424……………………………………………………………………………13
Program
Narrative……………………………………………………………………….……13
Budget and Budget Narrative…………………………………………………………………15
Indirect Cost Rate Agreement……………….…………………..……………………………15
Plan for Collecting the Data Required for Performance Measures ………………………16
Tribal Authorizing Resolution………………………………………………………………….16
Other
Attachments……………………………………………………….……………………16
Selection Criteria……………………………………………………………..…………………….…17
Review Process……………………………………………………………….………………………17
Additional Requirements ………..……………………………………….…………………………..17
Appendix A: Application Checklist…………………………………………………………………..20
OMB No. 1121-0329 Approval expires 02/28/13
2
OJJDP FY 2010 Youth with Sexual Behavior Problems Program

OJJDP FY 2010 Youth with Sexual
Behavior Problems Program
(CFDA # 16.543)
Overview
This program will provide funding to agencies that utilize a comprehensive multidisciplinary
approach in working with youth with sexual behavior problems and their child victims to provide
intervention and supervision services for the offending youth and treatment services for the
surviving child victim and family. Eligible applicants will target only those youth pre- or post-
adjudicated of an offense involving inappropriate sexual behaviors with a child and having no
prior history of court involvement for sexual misconduct, and their victims and families for
services. In addition, youth served under this program must be determined through a mental
health evaluation to be amenable to community-based treatment and intervention.
This program solicitation has two parts. Part A (Sites) will provide funding to up to three sites for
the purposes described above. Part B (Support and Technical Assistance) will provide funding
to one awardee that will provide support and technical assistance to the sites selected under
Part A.
This program is a collaboration between OJJDP and the Office of Sex Offender Sentencing,
Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering, and Tracking (SMART), and is authorized by the
Missing Children’s Assistance Act, 42 USC § 5773, and 42 USC 13941.
Deadlines: Registration and Application
Registration with Grants.gov is required prior to application submission. OJJDP encourages
applicants to register with Grants.gov several weeks before the application deadline of 8 p.m.,
Eastern Time, on June 28, 2010. See “How To Apply,” page 11, for details.
Eligibility
Under Part A of this solicitation, eligible applicants are limited to public agencies, including state
agencies, units of local government (including federally-recognized Indian tribal governments as
determined by the Secretary of the Interior and published in the Federal Register), public
universities and colleges (including tribal institutions of higher education), and private nonprofit
organizations (including faith-based, tribal, and community organizations). Under Part B of this
solicitation, applicants are limited to public colleges and universities and private nonprofit
organizations (including faith- and community-based organizations).
OJJDP welcomes joint applications from two or more eligible applicants; however, one applicant
must be designated as the primary applicant for correspondence, award, and management
purposes, and the others as co-applicants.
OMB No. 1121-0329 Approval expires 02/28/13
3
OJJDP FY 2010 Youth with Sexual Behavior Problems Program

Program-Specific Information
Background Information
Research indicates that youth commit more than one-quarter (25.8 percent) of all sex offenses
and more than one-third (35.6 percent) of sex offenses against juvenile victims.1 Often, youth
who offend in this manner, stay close to home when choosing their victims. Additional research
on youth who sexually offended against children found that as many as 40 percent of the victims
were either siblings or other relatives.2 This program seeks to assist communities in responding
to children who have been sexually victimized by other children/youth and to provide resources
focused on the youth exhibiting victimizing behaviors, with an emphasis on interfamilial and/or
co-residential incidents. Research suggests that by providing intervention services to youth
exhibiting inappropriate sexual behaviors early, the likelihood of future incidents and/or
escalation is greatly reduced.3 4
Studies have concluded that early adolescence is the peak age for sexual offenses against
younger children and most youth who sexually offend come to the attention of law enforcement
between the ages of 12-14.5 When youth victimize children, the impact of inappropriate sexual
behaviors on child victims by other youth can be devastating, long-lasting, and affect the entire
family/residence as a whole. Because someone they should be able to trust and often depend
on victimizes children, they may not realize that the behaviors exhibited are wrong and that
victimization is occurring. In fact, some of the research indicates that child victims of
inappropriate sexual behaviors by family members (primarily older sibling or older cousins and
often called incest) have more problems in romantic and family relationships, and more sexual
problems as they age.6 Other studies have found that these victims were more likely to abuse
substances in general, were more likely to have had a psychiatric hospitalization, to experience
clinical levels of depression and be at risk for suicide; were more likely to believe that their
parents were ashamed of them and did not love them; and were more likely to have required
police involvement and to have been picked up by police for running away from home.7 In order
to provide the most comprehensive treatment services to child victims of youth with sexual
behavior problems, services should also target the surviving parent/guardian. As noted by
research, “a child's ability to recover from sexual abuse may be greatly influenced by the
support she receives from a non-offending parent and evidence is growing that maternal
support is critical for a child's recovery for both the short and long term.8 Accordingly, in order to
best respond to child victimization it is imperative that the victims and families of youth with
1 Finkelhor, David, Ormrod, Richard, and Chaffin, Mark (September 2009). Juveniles Who Commit Sex Offenses Against
Minors
. Juvenile Justice Bulletin, A project of the Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of
Justice.www.ojp.usdoj.gov/ojjdp.
2 Hunter, J. (2000). Understanding juvenile sex offenders: Research findings and guidelines for effective management and
treatment.
Institute of Law, Psychiatry and Public Policy, University of Virginia: Juvenile Forensic Evaluation Resource
Center.
3 Carpentier, M., Silovsky, J.F., and Chaffin, M. (2006). Randomized trial of treatment for children with sexual behavior
problems: Ten-year follow-up
. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 74:482-488.
4 Bonner, B.L., Walker, C.E., & Berliner, L. (1999). Children with Sexual Behavior Problems: Assessment and treatment
(Final report, Grant No. 90-CA-1469). Washington, DC. Administration of Children, Youth, and Families, Dept. of Health
and Human Services, Retrieved from http://www.calib.com/nccanch/pubs/otherpubs/childassessment/index.cfm
5 Finkelhor, David, Ormrod, Richard, and Chaffin, Mark (September 2009). Juveniles Who Commit Sex Offenses Against
Minors
. Juvenile Justice Bulletin, A project of the Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of
Justice.www.ojp.usdoj.gov/ojjdp
6 Meiselman, K. (1978). Incest. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass
7 Russell, D. (1986). The secret trauma: Incest in the lives of girls and women. New York: Basic Books
8 Corcoran, J. (1998). In defense of mothers of sexual abuse victims. Families in Society, 79(4), 358-369.
OMB No. 1121-0329 Approval expires 02/28/13
4
OJJDP FY 2010 Youth with Sexual Behavior Problems Program

sexual behavior problems receive comprehensive family treatment in order to best recover from
the trauma associated with sexual victimization with minimal long-term consequence.
Purpose
The purpose of this program is to assist localities in responding to child sexual victimization by
youth between the ages of 10-14, exhibiting sexual behavior problems, placing a specific
emphasis on interfamilial and/or co-residential child victims and offenders. For the purposes of
this solicitation, children with sexual behavior problems are children aged 12 and under who
demonstrate developmentally inappropriate or aggressive sexual behavior. Adolescents with
sexual behavior problems are youth aged 13 and over with problematic sexual behaviors that
are potentially harmful to the youth. Examples of these types of behaviors include, but are not
limited to: sexual contact between children who do not know each other well; sexual contact
between children of different ages, size, and developmental level (usually a five year age
difference or greater); sexual contact that is aggressive or coerced; and sexual contact that
caused harm to the child or others, such as physical harm or contact that causes another child
to be highly upset and/or fearful. This program seeks to support evidence-based treatment and
community supervision for youth with sexual behavior problems, and treatment services to
victims and families of these youth.
Over the past decade, OJJDP has supported a number of projects geared toward advancing
knowledge and practice regarding assessment and treatment of juvenile sex offending. Major
challenges in this area continue to exist, particularly with regards to community-based
interventions. The two-fold purpose of the OJJDP FY10 Youth with Sexual Behavior Problems
Program is to provide support to localities in the development and implementation of
community-based treatment programs for youth aged 10-14 with sexual behavior problems, who
have exhibited inappropriate sexual behaviors against another child and for their victims. The
program will specifically address interfamilial and/or co-residential sexual misconduct for youth
aged 10-14, and provide adjunctive support services to child victims and families who have
experienced victimization. Applicants should propose comprehensive intervention strategies that
are evidence-based for serving both the child victim and the youth with sexual behavior
problems, as well as their families/guardians. Applicants under Part A must have a functioning
multi-disciplinary team that utilizes a comprehensive, holistic approach to treating both the child
victim as well as the youth with sexual behavior problems and demonstrate a history of working
with interfamilial child abuse cases. At a minimum, multi-disciplinary teams should consist of the
following members: social services staff, juvenile court staff, mental health personnel, victim
advocate personnel, law enforcement and community-support providers. This team should
serve as the case-staffing entity used to determine service provision for the child victim, family,
and the youth with sexual behavior problems.
In addition, under Part B of this solicitation, this program seeks to identify an organization to
provide guidance, support, and technical assistance to the awarded sites in working towards the
successful implementation of a community-based Youth with Sexual Behavior Problems
Program.
Goals and Objectives
The goal of Part A of this solicitation is to pilot programs designed to provide a comprehensive
community-based intervention to serve youth who are identified as having sexual behavior
problems and who are in pre-or post- adjudication for an inappropriate sexual behavior with a
family member, co-resident, or other child with close social ties to the perpetrator. The proposed
OMB No. 1121-0329 Approval expires 02/28/13
5
OJJDP FY 2010 Youth with Sexual Behavior Problems Program

interventions should also include support services for the child victim and non-offending family
or household members.
The goal of Part B of this solicitation is to develop, design, and deliver technical assistance that
provides support and guidance to the sites as they implement their community-based
management strategies for youth with sexual behavior problems and their victims and families.
Technical assistance needs may vary greatly depending on the site’s current practices. Some
sites may have a well-developed multi-disciplinary team that addresses such cases. Others may
have existing treatment services that specialize in juvenile sex offender treatment or
victim/family services, and some sites may lack this capacity entirely. As a result, applicants
must demonstrate competency in the following: 1) expertise in age and developmentally
appropriate problem sexual behavior treatment and interventions, supervision, and victim/family
support services, 2) experience in providing training and technical assistance on evidence-
based juvenile sex offender management practices, 3) expertise in multi-disciplinary,
collaborative team development, including, building community support and involvement 4)
experience in conducting system assessments, 5) experience in providing technical assistance
to a wide range of communities, agencies, and disciplines, 6) proficiency in training curriculum
development and delivery, and 7) experience in identifying and collecting data for purposes of
program evaluation.
Deliverables
Under Part A, deliverables should serve as a guide to other communities that wish to replicate
the project and include:
• a comprehensive community-based strategy to effectively treat youth with sexual behavior
problems aged 10-14 pre- or post- adjudication for inappropriate sexual misconduct against
a child family member, co-resident, or other child with close social ties
.
• a strategy to provide community-based support services to child victims and families of
youth with sexual behavior problems
• reports that speak to the effectiveness of the community-based interventions implemented
and the challenges encountered in implementation
• an evaluation plan that outlines how data will be collected and used for program planning.
Under Part B, deliverables include:
• training materials and curricula for the community-based treatment of youth with sexual
behavior problems
• resources for, and contributions to, the evidence-based treatment of victims of youth with
sexual behavior problems
• technical assistance to provide guidance and consultation to the funded program sites,
which should be provided on site, by phone, or through other media, as appropriate
• two 2-day cluster meetings (one in each project year) for OJJDP and SMART Office
program managers and up to three representatives from each of the three project sites for
OMB No. 1121-0329 Approval expires 02/28/13
6
OJJDP FY 2010 Youth with Sexual Behavior Problems Program

the purpose of providing technical assistance and training and sharing findings and
challenges
• individual training and technical assistance plans for each site
• reports for possible future publication and dissemination that document the progress of
project implementation and model developed at each site.
Part B Applicants should demonstrate their ability to devise materials appropriate to diverse
audiences including language and cultural minority groups.
Amount and Length of Awards
Under Part A, OJJDP anticipates making up to three awards of up to $333,333 per award for a
project period of up to 24 months. The award will cover the entire project period.
Under Part B, OJJDP, in conjunction with the Office of Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring,
Apprehending, Registering, and Tracking (SMART) anticipates making one award of up to
$250,000 per award for a project period of up to two years. The award will cover the entire
project period.
Applicants may not apply for awards under both Part A and Part B.
OJJDP will enter into a cooperative agreement with the successful applicants under Part A and
Part B. In furtherance of the goals and objectives described above, OJJDP and the Office of
Sex Offender Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering, and Tracking’s role will include the
following:
• reviewing and approving major work plans, including changes to such plans, and key
decisions pertaining to project operations
• reviewing and approving major project-generated documents and materials used in the
provision of project services
• reviewing and approving consultants
• providing guidance in significant project planning meetings and participating in project
sponsored training events or conferences
• reviewing and approving any proposed publications prior to release or publication. All
publications prepared under either Part A or Part B will be published and disseminated at
the sole discretion of OJJDP.
All awards are subject to the availability of appropriated funds and any modifications or
additional requirements that may be imposed by law.
OMB No. 1121-0329 Approval expires 02/28/13
7
OJJDP FY 2010 Youth with Sexual Behavior Problems Program

Budget Information
Limitation on Use of Award Funds for Employee Compensation; Waiver: With respect to
any award of more than $250,000 made under this solicitation, federal funds may not be used to
pay total cash compensation (salary plus bonuses) to any employee of the award recipient at a
rate that exceeds 110% of the maximum annual salary payable to a member of the Federal
Government’s Senior Executive Service (SES) at an agency with a Certified SES Performance
Appraisal System for that year. (The 2010 salary table for SES employees is available at
http://www.opm.gov/oca/10tables/indexSES.asp.) Note: A recipient may compensate an
employee at a higher rate, provided the amount in excess of this compensation limitation is paid
with non-federal funds. (Any such additional compensation will not be considered matching
funds where match requirements apply.)
The limitation on compensation rates allowable under an award may be waived on an individual
basis at the discretion of the Assistant Attorney General (AAG) for the Office of Justice
Programs. An applicant that wishes to request a waiver must include a detailed justification in
the budget narrative of its application. Unless the applicant submits a waiver request and
justification with the application, the applicant should anticipate that OJP will request that the
applicant adjust and resubmit their budget.
The justification should include: the particular qualifications and expertise of the individual, the
uniqueness of the service being provided, the individual’s specific knowledge of the program or
project being undertaken with award funds, and a statement explaining that the individual’s
salary is commensurate with the regular and customary rate for an individual with his/her
qualifications and expertise, and for the work that is to be done.
Match Requirement. Match is not required for this program.
Research, Human Subjects, IRB Review, and Confidentiality
All applicants for OJP funds are advised that the Department of Justice defines “research” as “a
systematic investigation, including research development, testing, and evaluation, designed to
develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge.” 28 C.F.R. § 46.102(d). If OJP determines
that a funded application involves research and includes human subjects, the approval of an
Institutional Review Board (IRB) might be required before OJP funds may be spent for these
purposes. If an application includes an evaluation component, that component will be examined
by OJP to determine whether it meets the definition of “research.” All applications should be as
clear as possible in describing the purpose of the evaluation, and the extent to which its findings
may contribute to generalizable knowledge.
The protection of human subjects of OJP-sponsored research is of critical importance. If an
application involves human subjects of research, it must explain whether IRB approval has been
or will be obtained, and it must explain applicant’s procedures for obtaining informed consent
and minimizing risks.
All applications that include a research or statistical component that collects information
identifiable to a private person will be required to complete and submit to OJP a privacy
certification.
For further guidance on federal regulations regarding research, human subjects protection, and
confidentiality, see the OJP Web page (www.ojp.usdoj.gov/funding/other_requirements.htm).
OMB No. 1121-0329 Approval expires 02/28/13
8
OJJDP FY 2010 Youth with Sexual Behavior Problems Program

Performance Measures
To assist DOJ in fulfilling its responsibilities under the Government Performance and Results
Act, P.L. 103–62, applicants who receive funding under this solicitation must provide data that
measures the results of their work. Applicants must discuss in their application their methods for
collecting data for performance measures. Refer to “What an Application Is Expected To
Include,” page 12, for additional information. Grantees are required to provide the data
requested in the “Data Grantee Provides” column so that OJP can calculate values for the
“Performance Measures” column. Performance measures for this solicitation are as follows:
Objective
Performance Measures
Data Grantees Provide
The solicitation’s overall
Direct Service Programs
OJJDP has an online system for grantee
objective is to:
(Intervention)
performance measures data reporting. To
access, see (ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/grantees/pm)
Part A: Develop and
implement community-
During the reporting period:
based intervention
programs for youthful
Percent of program youth
Number of program youth exhibiting a
sexual offenders aged
exhibiting a desired change in
desired change in the targeted behavior.
10-14 and their victims
the targeted behavior.
and non-offending family
or household members.
Number of program youth
Number of program youth served
offenders served.
offenders.
Number of service hours
Number of service hours completed by
completed by program youth
program youth offenders.
offenders.
Number of child victims served.
Number of child victims served.
Number of service hours
Number of service hours provided to child
provided to child victims.
victims.
Number of youth with whom an
Number of youth with whom an evidence-
evidence-based practice was
based practice was used.
used.
Number of program materials
Number of program materials developed.
developed.
Number of planning activities
Number of planning activities conducted.
conducted.
Number of program
Number of program staff/community
staff/community
members/professionals trained.
members/professionals trained.
OMB No. 1121-0329 Approval expires 02/28/13
9
OJJDP FY 2010 Youth with Sexual Behavior Problems Program

Objective
Performance Measures
Data Grantees Provide
Part B: To provide
Number of training requests
Number of training requests received.
guidance, support, and
received.
assistance to the
awarded sites in working Number of technical assistance
Number of technical assistance requests
towards the successful
requests received.
received .
implementation of the
program.
Number of program materials
Number of program materials developed.
developed.
Number of planning or training
Number of planning or training events
events held.
held.
Number of people trained.
Number of people trained.
Percent of people exhibiting
Number of people exhibiting increased
increased knowledge of the
knowledge of the program area, as
program area.
determined by pre- and post- testing.
Number of program policies
Number of program policies changed,
changed, improved, or
improved, or rescinded.
rescinded.
Percent of organizations
Number of organizations that receive
reporting improvements in
training and technical assistance.
operations based on training
and technical assistance.
Number of those served by TTA.
Number of organizations that report
improvements in operations.
Percent of those served by
Number of organizations reporting
training and technical
improvements in operations based on
assistance who reported
training and technical assistance.
implementing an evidence-
based program and/or practice
Number of those served by TTA who
during or after the TTA.
reported implementing an evidence-
based program and/or practice during or
after the TTA.
For more information about OJJDP performance measures, see
www.ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/grantees/pm/ or contact Janet Chiancone at janet.chiancone@usdoj.gov.
OMB No. 1121-0329 Approval expires 02/28/13
10
OJJDP FY 2010 Youth with Sexual Behavior Problems Program

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