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Private School - Discover The System That 1000's of Students are Already Using to Raise Their
ISEE Test & SSAT Test Scores! Check This Link Now
http://doiop.com/privateschool

==== ====

The question of how to educate a child is one of the most important a parent can ask. A basic
choice that many parents struggle with is that of public vs. private school. Parents do not want to
take on unnecessary expenses if they will not ultimately benefit their child. After all, many public
schools do an excellent job of educating students. But while it is true that public schools do not
have tuition costs (and a private school can run, on average from 12,000 to 30,000 dollars a year),
the benefits of a private education can still far outweigh the costs depending on the local options
parents may face.

Students who attend private schools can be more academically challenged, exposed to clearer
value systems, given greater access to teachers, and may simply feel safer than local public
school options. If you do decide to pursue private schooling for your child, start the research
process early. Admission to private schools can be competitive, and finding a school that is a
perfect fit for your child where he or she will be also be accepted, may take some time.

A Higher Bar:

A major advantage to private education is that your child will likely be challenged to a higher
academic standard. Private schools can be more academically rigorous than public schools, and
private school students may have to meet more criteria to keep up their grade point averages.
According to The Condition of Education 2001, from the National Center for Education Statistics,
Private high schools typically have more demanding graduation requirements than do public high
schools.

Compared with public schools, private schools required more coursework (in 4-year high school
programs). More can be expected of private school students in terms of quality of work, course
workload, and special requirements such as community service or Arts participation. In some
schools, what would normally be considered extracurricular activities, are prerequisites for
graduation, which ultimately round out students' high school experience. The push to meet this
higher standard often results in a greater level of student performance. In a recent NAEP report it
was found that, 'Students in private schools scored significantly above the national average in
grades four, eight, and twelve.

As the report put it, 'Performance results in 2002 show that, at all three grades, students who
attended nonpublic schools had higher average writing scores than students who attended public
schools.' In general, a student given the opportunity to attend a private school will most likely
reach a higher level of academic achievement.

Student Teacher Ratio:


Private schools also tend to focus on controlling their class sizes. The NCES Schools and Staffing
Survey found that, 'Private high schools on average are less than half the size of public schools. In
central cities, for example, the average size of a private high school is 398, compared to 1,083 for
a public school.' Students of private schools may have more opportunities to form relationships
with their teachers, which can lead them to greater academic success. In such cases, a student is
given help for his or her specific academic problems, which can allow the issue to be resolved
quickly and correctly.

Once any issues inhibiting a student's progress have been addressed, the child can go on to
achieve at his or her highest level. In The Condition of Education 2002, it was found that, 'Placing
students in small groups tends to foster close working relationships between teachers and
students, thus enhancing learning, particularly among at-risk students and those in the early
grades.'

Also, small classes allow the teachers to have a better sense of who your child is, and what his or
her specific strengths and weaknesses are. Your child will also have more opportunities to speak
up and participate in class discussions. In addition, students may be offered office hours during
which the teacher will be available. Students who have worked closely with their teachers are less
likely to feel intimidated about using such time to actively seek help from their teachers directly.

Exposure to the Arts:

Private schools have the ability to create their own curriculum. Although, they must ultimately
prepare students with the same basic course as any other school, private schools also have the
option to add various elements to their programs. Private school administrators often develop
programs that emphasize the Arts, perhaps more so than local public schooling options.

Schools may choose to produce elaborate plays and musicals, giving students unique
opportunities to explore their talents and express themselves. Government regulations on public
schools prevent them from spending more than a certain percentage of school funds on the Arts.
Private schools, however, are not subject to the same regulations, and they have more freedom to
develop and expand these programs as they wish. Some private schools may even offer
filmmaking or video production courses which are opportunities normally reserved for college
students.

Potentially More Funds:

The tuition that you and the other parents of a private school contribute often will go toward
developing and funding special programs that would be restricted in public schools. The school
may be able to offer other activities such as special field trips that reinforce the school's
curriculum. Such trips can give your child opportunities to form close friendships and build
independence. The school may have more funds available to provide supplies to student-run
clubs. The school also may create programs that better tie the arts or sciences into the overall
general curriculum.

A Push Towards College:


Private high schools can instill their students with the expectation of attending college. Data from
the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988, 'Fourth Follow-up' (NELS: 1988/2000) show
that, 'Students who had attended private school in 8th grade were twice as likely as those who had
attended public school to have completed a bachelor's or higher degree by their mid-20s (52
versus 26 percent) and far less likely to have had no postsecondary education.'

With college as a focus, students can be more goal oriented, and often elements of the schools
curriculum will be specifically aimed at preparing your child for college. Many private schools are
even referred to as 'college preparatory.' Private schools often encourage their students to take an
active role in their own college admission process. Students may be given more access to
information about college options, and they may be made more aware of the requirements they
must fulfill to qualify for a specific school.

Community Service and a Sense of Values:

Private schools often put a major emphasis on personal values. When choosing a private school
for your child, it is possible to find a school that incorporates a great deal of your own values into
its everyday curriculum. Private schools often have honor codes and stricter behavioral standards
that help students develop into mature adults.

According to The Condition of Education 2001 from the National Center for Education Statistics,
'At private schools, a greater percentage of children had parents who were very satisfied with
order and discipline than with the school or teachers in 1999.' Parents are often given greater say
in school policies at private schools.

Many private schools require that their students complete a mandatory number of community
service hours. This not only provides the obvious benefit of instilling a sense of respect for the
community and the importance of making a contribution to society, but it also happens to be
something colleges especially favor. Students may also find possible career options while fulfilling
this service requirement such as political involvement to aid the community or counseling for
endangered teens. Community service experiences teach students that education goes beyond
the walls of the school, and that it sometimes requires action and initiative.

Discipline and Safety:

Beyond the fact that smaller classrooms are by their very nature easier to control, most private
schools put special emphasis on discipline. Even if your child does not have discipline problems,
disruptive peers could take away from your child's valuable learning time. The Condition of
Education 2002 states that, 'Private school teachers were more likely than public school teachers
to say that they had a lot of influence on setting student performance standards (63 versus 38
percent) and on student discipline policy (48 versus 30 percent).'

The push for discipline in private schools teaches children self control, which will ultimately be a
requirement in college where the student will be far more responsible for his or her own
attendance, and achievement. Also, stricter disciplinary policies mean that any major problems will
be handled and eradicated quickly. Typical crimes that plague public schools are less common at
private schools. The School Crime and Safety Report found that, 'Students in public schools (37.3
percent) were more apt to see hate-related graffiti at school than their counterparts in private

schools (16.8 percent).'

A Word About Teachers:

Because teachers at private schools are not required to earn the same certifications as public
school teachers, some parents worry that the teachers are not as qualified. This is not necessarily
true. Private schools must maintain their reputations and create positive word of mouth to survive.
Toward this end, private schools are generally very selective about who they place in front of their
students, and they choose educators with training specific to the subject they will be teaching.

A Community in Itself:

When you decide to enroll your child in a private school, your family becomes part of a network of
families with the same goals. Parents at private schools are more involved in the lives of the
students and various school events. As a parent, you may have the opportunity to connect with
other parents to discuss the lives of your children. Such relationships allow parents to learn from
each other and support each other.

The students also benefit from the community atmosphere of private schools. The very specific
personalities of private schools often lead the students to have a strong sense of pride and loyalty
to the school and its community. The student may also benefit from affiliation to the school far
beyond graduation day. Many private schools have alumni mentoring programs that connect older
alumni with newer ones. Recent graduates may find internship opportunities with alumni who have
been working in their field of interest.

Every Family is Different:

Despite the numerous benefits of private schooling, it must be said that private school is not for
every child. Some children would benefit from the diversity a public school can offer. Some
parents would prefer their children to be more focused on the core subjects rather than the arts
and extracurricular interests. And, of course, the financial burden that a private school brings is
considerable. No student is exactly the same as another, and only a parent can know what the
best option is for his or her child. Any child, whether in private or public school, will need the active
participation of his or her parents in order to achieve true success.

School Choice:

The major advantage of private schooling is choice. Rather than sending your child to a public
school that is required based on geography, now you have opened up a selection of several
schools that may have very different educational styles and emphases, simply because you are
deciding on private education. Every private school has a unique personality, and with a little
research, certain schools will emerge from the pool as having more features than that will benefit
your child.

Perhaps the school is affiliated with your family's religious faith, and your child can be given a
religious education along with his or her core studies. Perhaps the school emphasizes writing, or it
pushes self-expression. With the vast variety of private schools available, it is easy to select a
school that will help your child to shine and develop the values you find most important.


Conclusion:

No choice can guarantee that your child's formative years will go smoothly. Parents should always
remain highly active participants in the education of their children. Still, in the interest of giving a
student the most advantages and opportunities possible private school can be an attractive option.

Private schools can reduce worries about safety, increase a child's exposure to discipline, offer
reduced class sizes, and offer a good environment for high academic achievement. In many
cases, a private school can prove to be much more than that, providing a community environment
for your family and special opportunities that your child would not have otherwise.

Javier Colayco is the founder of Private School Review (http://www.privateschoolreview.com), a
site that profiles of K-12 private schools across the USA. The site evaluates schools relative to
each other and provides community data to help families make better educational choices.


Article Source:
http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Javier_Colayco




==== ====

Private School - Discover The System That 1000's of Students are Already Using to Raise Their
ISEE Test & SSAT Test Scores! Check This Link Now
http://doiop.com/privateschool

==== ====

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