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Professional Field Lacrosse in British Columbia 1909-1924

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An in-depth statistical history of professional-level (field) lacrosse played in Vancouver and New Westminster between 1909 and 1924. Contains box scores for each and every match played, detailed player statistics, and historical photographs from the hey-day of lacrosse on the West Coast.
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  • Tags: lacrosse, history, canada, british columbia, vancouver, new westminster, lacrosse statistics
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  • Name: Dave StewartCandy

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Professional
Field Lacrosse
In
British Columbia

1909-1924



compiled & Edited by David Stewart-Candy

Vancouver
2012

Professional Field Lacrosse in British Columbia 1909-1924
Stewart-Candy, David J.


First Printing - completed as of February 14, 2012


# ____ of 25


Proletkult Produktion
Vancouver
(c)2012










Primary research for this book was compiled from game boxscores printed in the
Vancouver Daily Province and New Westminster British Columbian newspapers.
Additional newspapers used to locate and verify conflicting, damaged, or missing data were
the Victoria Daily Colonist, Vancouver World & Vancouver Daily World, Vancouver Daily
Sun
& Vancouver Sun, and Vancouver Daily News Advertiser. Research was done by the
author at the Vancouver Public Library (Robson Street branch) and New Westminster
Public Library between 2002 and 2012.

All photographs unless otherwise noted are in public domain copyright and sourced from
the City of Vancouver Archives.

Author contact information:



Dave Stewart-Candy










3391 Marquette Crescent










Vancouver, British Columbia V5S 4L7










(604) 879-6846










davidjsc@gmail.com

This work is dedicated to Larry `Wamper' Power
and Stan Shillington... Wamper for the years of
encouragement and diligently keeping on my
back to ensure this project finally reached
completion... Stan for his lament that statistics for
field lacrosse were never set aside for future
generations... until now... both these men
inspired me to sit down and do for field lacrosse
statistics what they did for box lacrosse...



THE ORIGINS OF PROFESSIONAL LACROSSE IN BRITISH COLUMBIA

1882-1886 ...Forgotten beginnings

The first `organised' lacrosse game played in British Columbia (between teams representing two
different cities) occurred on Saturday, August 28, 1886; played at Beacon Hill Park between the Vancouver
and Victoria clubs, the visiting mainlanders won by the score of 3-1 - or three "games" to one, in the old-
style nomenclature used at the time.
However, while this particular match has gone into the history books as the first lacrosse game
played in the province, the game's roots in British Columbia actually go back by four years to 1882. On
Thursday, February 16 of that year, an athletic club was organised in Victoria that included lacrosse as one
of its sports. This was then followed by a highly-publicised match played at Beacon Hill Park on Saturday,
June 17, 1882 - although it was essentially a scrimmage game between two teams made up from the
mostly-inexperienced players of the Victoria Athletic Club. There are also newspaper records of a match in
Victoria involving an unidentified collegiate team played a few weeks later as well as a photograph in the
provincial archives dated from almost exactly a year later in 1883, taken in Victoria, of an unidentified
lacrosse team in that city.

1886-1890 ...The National Game finds its feet

In the years between the 1886 Beacon Hill match and the formation of the British Columbia
Amateur Lacrosse Association (BCALA) in 1890, lacrosse clubs would make haphazard arrangements for
challenge matches - usually to be held on such popular, public holiday events as Empire Day or Dominion
Day.
Like 1886, there was only one match reported played in 1887 - played between Victoria and
Vancouver on Dominion Day with Victoria winning by two goals / "games" to none.
New Westminster newspapers reported the formation of a lacrosse club in that city on May 12,
1888, but local fans would have to wait another year before the first ever lacrosse game played in the Royal
City. On June 8, 1889, the visiting Vancouver team dispatched the inexperienced New Westminster side
with a 3-1 result. From such inauspicious beginnings on that Saturday afternoon, no one in attendance
could have known they had just witnessed the birth of what would become arguably one of the most
legendary lacrosse clubs in all of competitive sports.
The 1888 season saw multiple challenges being issued back and forth between the Victoria and
Vancouver clubs. In August, Kamloops played host to a match between the Victoria Lacrosse Club and
Vancouver Lacrosse Club during the Canadian Pacific Railroad picnic held there. Won 3-2 by Victoria, the
match took around three hours duration to complete. At one point, high winds and a dust storm interrupted
play and it took fifty minutes to complete play for the final "game".
The following year (1889) saw Vancouver Lacrosse Club put forth the Alhambra Cup for
competition - originally to be won by the team winning the most matches played in Vancouver, although as
the playing season progressed, the Vancouver club would sometimes announce beforehand that, regardless
of location, the upcoming game would count towards Alhambra Cup competition. After some wrangling,
Vancouver and New Westminster ended up making the trip in September to the Kamloops CPR picnic to
play; in the meanwhile, Victoria stayed home uninvited and sulked, feeling snubbed by the two other
teams.
Concerns over betting at the final Alhambra Cup match in October 1889, which ended in a 2-2
draw, and disagreements between Vancouver and New Westminster over rules and player eligibility to play
for what they deemed the `championship', led some people to look at the example of Eastern Canada - for
example, usage of a set code of rules like those used by the Manitoba Lacrosse Association. This
encouraged them to look towards forming their own provincial association. A week before Christmas of
1889, during a dinner hosted by the president of the Vancouver Lacrosse Club for his players, discussion
about the formation of a provincial association was brought up. The move towards formal, organised
lacrosse would start to take shape the following spring.





1890-1908 ... Marching towards Professionalism

The (original) British Columbia Amateur Lacrosse Association was formed at a meeting held in
Vancouver at the Windsor Hotel between the Vancouver, Victoria, and New Westminster clubs on March
22, 1890. A schedule of six matches was drafted up and New Westminster swept their series to claim the
first provincial championship (although some later historical records indicate Victoria as the champion of
the inaugural season).
Vancouver would then win the next two titles (1891, 1892) followed by Victoria in 1893 (some
records indicate New Westminster) - however over the following years, New Westminster would dominate
the championship scene with titles in 1894, 1895, and 1897 through 1902 with Vancouver picking up the
slack in the intervening years.
The 1892 season was a great example of early organised field lacrosse. In an incredibly close
campaign, each of Vancouver's five victories for the title was won by 1-goal margins, yet they still
managed to let in more goals than they scored for the entire season. In those days, each goal scored was
actually called winning a "game" and play ended after one team had accumulated four "games" to win the
match or time ran out.
Victoria would have to wait until 1919 before winning a second senior amateur title for the Capital
City but their closest attempt came during the 1894 season when they tied New Westminster in the league
standings. As a result of the draw, a playoff game to determine the championship was played on October
20, 1894 at Brockton Oval in Vancouver. New Westminster showed up at the field an hour and a half late
and this later caused the game being called due to darkness and Victoria holding a 3-2 lead with eleven
minutes remaining. The referee refused to give the victory to Victoria and the club later withdrew from the
BCALA on November 2, 1894 in protest of the referee's indecision and the late arrival of their opponents.
Two campaigns around the turn of the century - in 1899 and 1900 - saw organised league play
deteriorate from numerous cancellations of matches. For example, in August 1900, some scheduled league
matches involving New Westminster were cancelled due to their subsequently organised tour of Eastern
Canada in August 1900. There were also some matches against Victoria that New Westminster possibly
refused to play - allegedly due to `rough play' on Victoria's part in meetings earlier in the season.
The senior ranks expanded in 1901 with the return of the Nanaimo Lacrosse Club after a two-year
hiatus. The Coal City crew were able to secure a couple of surprise victories at the expense of the
Vancouver club but generally remained the league's whipping post for the duration of their senior tenure.
By mid-point of the 1902 season, the club had withdrawn from the league and defaulted their five
remaining matches. The Vancouver YMCA lacrosse club went back east in October 1901 to challenge for
the Minto Cup, the senior championship of Canada which was inaugurated earlier that season.
The 1903 senior lacrosse season ended in dispute between New Westminster and Vancouver and
the league championship was still vehemently undecided at the start of the 1904 campaign. The differences
between the two clubs dragged on after the three-team schedule was released. New Westminster withdrew
from the league on June 2, 1904 after refusal to play two replays to decide the 1903 champion. There was
some talk of a second Vancouver team joining, but in the end Vancouver Lacrosse Club and Victoria
continued on with an eight-game schedule, which Vancouver handily won after five victories.
In 1905, the BCALA league was reformed with four members: New Westminster, Vancouver,
Victoria, and a newly-formed club from Seattle. The Emerald City club was later ejected from the league
after they were unable to play their two final scheduled games - a move somewhat encouraged by
Vancouver since it would improve their record against their league-leading rivals in the Royal City.
The following season saw Victoria withdraw from the senior league and Vancouver field a second
club in the form of the Mount Pleasant Maple Leafs. Late in the season, in September 1906, lacrosse
players and fans saw the donation of the Kilmarnock Cup as a trophy for the provincial senior
championship. Through the efforts of Victoria Lacrosse Club, the $500 mug was donated on behalf of the
scotch distillers John Walker & Sons and brought over from England. The Kilmarnock Cup would remain
in competition until retired at the close of the 1960s.
New Westminster became the first Kilmarnock Cup champion in 1907, defeating Mount Pleasant
Maple Leafs 5-4. Mount Pleasant had previously bested the Vancouver Lacrosse Club 11-4 in an intra-city
playoff.
Victoria rejoined the senior league for 1908. The original schedule was then revised in August to
accommodate New Westminster's challenge trip to Montreal that resulted in the successful capture of the
Minto Cup for the West Coast.

On September 26, 1908 in the final New Westminster-Vancouver match of the season, escalating
player tempers on the field saw a riot break out when a New Westminster fan pelted a Vancouver player
with eggs - which resulted in George Paris, the Vancouver trainer, retaliating by pulling out his gun and
firing a shot into the crowd. Thankfully, no one was killed, although the bullet went through the coat of one
spectator. Both clubs felt they were victims in the ugly incident and Vancouver stated their refusal to "play
any further games in New Westminster..."


1909-1915 ...The Watershed Years of West Coast Lacrosse

The infamous gunshot incident of 1908, still talked about amongst fans as late as the 1950s, was
soon forgotten by the start of the following season, buried under the growing contentious debate regarding
professionalism in the sport. During the 1908, New Westminster Salmonbellies, an amateur team,
challenged and defeated the Montreal Shamrocks and Ottawa Capitals, both professional teams, for the
Minto Cup - which was awarded to the professional champion of Canada. Now tainted for playing against
professionals, New Westminster's players had their amateur status revoked. As a result, in 1909 the
BCALA went professional and the organisation became a league known as the British Columbia Lacrosse
Association - although some amateur players were allowed and did compete alongside the professional
players that season.
The bulk of the senior amateurs then formed a new organisation called the Pacific Coast Amateur
Lacrosse Association. Around the same time, the British Columbia Coast Lacrosse Association formed on
May 9, 1909 to replace the former BCALA as the provincial governing body for amateur players.
The professional BCLA consisted of New Westminster Salmonbellies and the Vancouver
Lacrosse Club and would stay at two member teams throughout its entire tenure - although as we shall see,
many a season would be abandoned due to squabbling between clubs and owners. On July 24, 1909, the
Vancouver Lacrosse Club won their first away game in four years, drubbing the Royal City squad 6-1 in
front of the largest crowd out so far that season.
North Vancouver Lacrosse Club applied to the BCLA in 1911 for membership. Two test matches
were arranged in the pre-season pitting the North Vancouver squad against the two pro clubs. After being
soundly defeated by results of 12-3 and 13-3, their application was quickly rejected.
The 1911 campaign probably stands as the high-water mark of British Columbian lacrosse in
terms of both quality on the field and popularity in the stands. Edouard `Newsy' Lalonde, regarded as the
greatest lacrosse player of the first half of the 20th century, was signed on for $3,500 ($72,000 in modern
currency) - an incredible sum of cash in those days for a professional athlete. The series between the two
local rivals was very close and intense; the regular season resulting in a draw in the standings and a two-
game, total-goals playoff was required to determine that year's Minto cupholders. Vancouver secured their
first ever shutout against the hated Salmonbellies during the second of a pair of exhibition matches held in
honour of the royal coronation. Crowds were huge, the 12,045 that weathered out a drizzled Dominion Day
afternoon at Recreation Park was believed to have been a record breaker. Crowds in the range of 8,000 - in
excess of record numbers just ten years prior - were considered the norm of the day and the attendance
record would be surpassed again when the Toronto Tecumsehs unsuccessfully challenged the Vancouver
Lacrosse Club for the Minto Cup in October.
After three seasons of unprecedented popularity, the BCLA season collapsed seven games into the
1913 campaign. The Salmonbellies again had issues with the Vancouver club and had refused to start their
Dominion Day match, walking off the field in protest. After almost two weeks with no agreement in the
dispute, the Vancouver Lacrosse Club just simply withdrew from the league on July 17, 1913.
With Vancouver club president Con Jones, the famous local sports promoter and owner of a chain
of tobacconist's shops, now calling it quits and out of the picture, popular interest in the game began to
wane. More than any other individual, Jones was responsible for the promotion and growth of enthusiastic
public support of lacrosse in the heady days of the early 1910s with his vast sums of money thrown around
for signing players. His `retirement' now coincided with the gradual departure of lacrosse from the sporting
public's hearts and minds.
After a successful PCALA season, the Vancouver Athletic Club fielded a professional team in
1914 and replaced the departed Vancouver Lacrosse Club in the BCLA. However, they too failed to make
it to the end of the season as the club disbanded on July 8, 1914 - which sadly saw the end of one of the
more promising pro seasons on the pitch to have come along in a few years.

For an all-too-brief moment in time, a pro league called the Western Lacrosse Association was
formed in 1915 as a replacement for the (temporarily folded) BCLA with teams in Vancouver and Victoria.
After the initial announcement of this newly formed league, no further reference was ever made to it again.
New Westminster soon returned to the pro fold along with Vancouver - and, so too did Con Jones. Victoria
was then quietly dropped and as far as anyone was concerned, the BCLA was back in business as per usual.
The British Columbia Amateur Lacrosse Association was formed in May 1915, six years after the
demise of the previous BCALA incarnation as yet another provincial lacrosse body. There were now a
whole host of provincial bodies abound: the BCALA, the PCALA, and the BCCLA organisations in the
amateur ranks and the BCLA for the professional players.
Organised Lacrosse fell by the wayside in 1916 and suspended operations for the duration of the
First World War as the war effort took centre-stage attention.

1918-1924 ...Post-war Revival and the End of an Era

The Mainland Lacrosse Association was formed in 1918 with New Westminster and Vancouver as
a pro league replacement to the inactive BCLA.
However a year later at the BCLA Annual Meetings held on May 8 and 15, 1919, the Minto Cup
Trustees and British Columbia Lacrosse Association refused to recognise the results of the Mainland
Lacrosse Association series as being official. Vancouver had won the eight-game series but would not be
awarded the Minto Cup. Vancouver claimed that they were in perfect order to organise a new league in lieu
of the BCLA, which had suspended operations for the duration of World War One. New Westminster
disagreed and claimed (somewhat well after the fact) that their club did not actually operate in 1918.
The British Columbia Lacrosse Association resumed play that season with the New Westminster
Salmonbellies and Vancouver Terminals.
A year later, in 1920, the May 24 game saw the largest crowd turnout in New Westminster since
the heady days of 1911. The Dominion Day match-up saw the novelty of four movie cameras in attendance
along with numerous fans from Vancouver Island and from as far as Seattle and Tacoma. The large crowds
continued throughout the season.
May 1921 saw the formation of a second professional club in Vancouver - the Vancouver
Lacrosse Club, fronted by Con Jones - after a large majority of the players with the Vancouver Terminals
bolted the team due to money issues. After the New Westminster Salmonbellies declared their refusal to
play Jones's new team and stated they would only compete against the Terminals for the Minto Cup, Jones
responded by forming a Victoria club and starting up a second, professional league for his team to play in.
This new league was called the Pacific Coast Lacrosse Association (different from the amateur
PCALA in existence at the same time) and consisted of the new Vancouver Lacrosse Club and Victoria
Capitals. With two professional leagues in operation simultaneously, as many as 16 players were recruited
from Ontario - the majority signing with the Vancouver Terminals in the BCLA as replacements for those
players lost to the Vancouver Lacrosse Club team in the PCLA. Victoria Capitals also benefited from the
influx of Easterners to buttress their roster. Amongst all this roster movement, only New Westminster
seemed unaffected.
However, soon after the PCLA played its first game, it was obvious to all that Victoria was
seriously outclassed and talks began to merge into a three-team league with two Vancouver clubs and the
Salmonbellies. No merger agreement was able to be worked out - and after five games into the season, the
PCLA disbanded on June 13, 1921. Four days later, the Vancouver Lacrosse Club applied to join the
BCLA but their request was denied. As the rest of the BCLA season played out, some Vancouver players in
the PCLA eventually made their way back to their original BCLA club from which they had departed.
The BCLA league became a fatality in September 1923 with two games remaining to be played.
Like many previous seasons lost during mid-season, it was due to a grievance over scheduling.
Like many other seasons, 1924 started with a lot of promise. But in the end, it proved to be the
final curtain call when professional lacrosse in British Columbia died an inglorious death on June 3, 1924
after Con Jones, who had returned to finance and operate the Vancouver Terminals, suddenly withdrew his
financial backing from his club - ostensibly due to poor health. When no one else could be found to step up
to the plate and bankroll the Terminals, the season disbanded and professional lacrosse died an unnoticed
death when it failed to rise from the ashes the following year... unlike it had done every time before when a
season was lost due to a suspended campaign.


PLAYER POSITIONS NAMES

Until the 1940s, field lacrosse had specific names for identifying each and every position on the playing
field. This nomenclature is still encountered in women's field lacrosse:

ATTACK
MIDFIELD
DEFENSE
GOAL
IH - Inside Home
2H - Second Home
1D - First Defense
G - Goaltender
OH - Outside Home
(3H - Third Home)
CP - Coverpoint

1H - First Home
C - Centre
P - Point


(3D - Third Defense)



2D - Second Defense



The two positions above listed in parentheses (`third home' and `third defense') were eliminated in 1919
when 10-man rules replaced 12-man rules, although the 12-man rules had a brief revival two years later
with the Pacific Coast Lacrosse Association. While it may appear the midfield would become more
cluttered with 2 extra midfielders per team in the 12-man game, keep in mind that 12-man lacrosse was
generally played on a larger playing field - such as a cricket oval or baseball diamond, rather than on a
soccer-sized pitch as used in the modern game. Playing field sizes began to be reduced starting in 1915.

The chart below shows the player positions for the 10-man version of the game.




1909 BRITISH COLUMBIA LACROSSE ASSOCIATION

PROFESSIONAL LEAGUE




GP
W L
T



GF GA
PTS
New Westminster Salmonbellies*



10
7
3
0



69 65
14
Vancouver Lacrosse Club




10
3
7
0



65 69
6

MINTO CUP CHALLENGES
New Westminster defeated Regina Capitals in two-game, total-goals series 18-6 (6-4, 12-2)
New Westminster defeated Toronto Tecumsehs in two-game, total-goals series 12-9 (6-4, 6-5)

EXHIBITIONS
Vancouver Lacrosse Club defeated Regina Capitals 8-7
Toronto Tecumsehs defeated Regina Capitals 17-7


























May 20, 1909 - MINTO CUP: Regina Capitals 4 at New Westminster Salmonbellies 6

NEW WESTMINSTER: `Sandy' Gray, goaltender; Charlie Galbraith, point; Tom Gifford, coverpoint; Jack Gifford, first defence; George Rennie, second defence; Tom Rennie,
third defence; James `Pat' Feeney, centre; Cliff Spring, third home; Bill Turnbull, second home; Alex Turnbull, first home; Len Turnbull, outside home; Jack Bryson, inside home

REGINA: Alvan `Bun' Clark, goaltender; Howard, point; Edouard `Newsy' Lalonde, coverpoint; West, first defence; Shea, second defence; Davidson, third defence; Warwick,
centre; Harry `Sport' Murton, third home; Allen, second home; Gorman, first home; McGregor, outside home; McDoughall, inside home

FIRST QUARTER: 1) New Westminster - Jack Bryson 3:31; 2) Regina - Harry Murton 9:30; 3) Regina - Gorman 1:49
SECOND QUARTER: 4) New Westminster - Jack Bryson 2:09; 5) New Westminster - Cliff Spring 3:27; 6) New Westminster - Alex Turnbull 3:08; 7) New Westminster - Tom
Rennie 2:22; 8) New Westminster - Bill Turnbull 7:54
THIRD QUARTER: 9) Regina - McGregor 2:17
FOURTH QUARTER: 10) Regina - Warwick 9:01






1st
2nd
3rd
4th

NEW WESTMINSTER

1
5
0
0

= 6
REGINA



2
0
1
1

= 4

PENALTIES: NEW WESTMINSTER: Tom Gifford 10 PIM, 1st Q; REGINA: Warwick 15 PIM, 1st Q; Howard 5 PIM, 2nd Q; West 5 PIM, 3rd Q; Shea 10 PIM, 4th Q





ATTENDANCE: estimated at 5,000

REFEREE: AE Macnaughton (Vancouver); JUDGE OF PLAY: George Matheson (Vancouver); GOAL UMPIRES: RH `Bob' Cheyne (New Westminster), W McLaughlin
(Regina); PENALTY TIMEKEEPERS: HC Major (New Westminster), Weldy Clark (Vancouver); TIMEKEEPERS: JJ Johnston (New Westminster), JW Moir (Calgary)

























May 24, 1909 - MINTO CUP: Regina Capitals 2 at New Westminster Salmonbellies 12

NEW WESTMINSTER: `Sandy' Gray, goaltender; Charlie Galbraith, point; Tom Gifford, coverpoint; Jack Gifford, first defence; George Rennie, second defence; Tom Rennie,
third defence; James `Pat' Feeney, centre; Cliff Spring, third home; Bill Turnbull, second home; Alex Turnbull, first home; Len Turnbull, outside home; Jack Bryson, inside home

REGINA: Alvan `Bun' Clark, goaltender; Howard, point; Edouard `Newsy' Lalonde, coverpoint; West, first defence; Shea, second defence; Davidson, third defence; Warwick,
centre; Harry `Sport' Murton, third home; Allen, second home; Gorman, first home; McGregor, outside home; McDoughall, inside home

FIRST QUARTER: 1) New Westminster - Len Turnbull 2:08; 2) New Westminster - Cliff Spring 4:13; 3) New Westminster - Jack Bryson 6:03; 4) New Westminster - Jack
Bryson 2:37; 5) New Westminster - Jack Bryson 2:39
SECOND QUARTER: 6) New Westminster - Len Turnbull 4:26; 7) New Westminster - Cliff Spring 3:38; 8) New Westminster - Len Turnbull 3:31; 9) Regina - Gorman 4:55;
10) Regina - McDougall 1:05
THIRD QUARTER: no scoring
FOURTH QUARTER: 11) New Westminster - Cliff Spring 1:01; 12) New Westminster - Cliff Spring 2:35; 13) New Westminster - Bill Turnbull 1:29; 14) New Westminster -
George Rennie 0:13






1st
2nd
3rd
4th

NEW WESTMINSTER

5
3
0
4

= 12
REGINA



0
2
0
0

= 2

PENALTIES: NEW WESTMINSTER: none; REGINA: Howard 5 PIM, 1st Q; Davidson 10 PIM, 3rd Q





ATTENDANCE: "close to the 10,000 mark"

REFEREE: AE Macnaughton (Vancouver); JUDGE OF PLAY: George Matheson (Vancouver); GOAL UMPIRES: Frank Johns (New Westminster), W McLaughlin (Regina);
PENALTY TIMEKEEPERS: HC Major (New Westminster), Weldy Clark (Vancouver); TIMEKEEPERS: JJ Johnston (New Westminster), JW Moir (Calgary)

























June 12, 1909 - Vancouver Lacrosse Club 5 at New Westminster Salmonbellies 8

NEW WESTMINSTER: `Sandy' Gray, goaltender; Charlie Galbraith, point; Tom Gifford, coverpoint; Jack Gifford, first defence; George Rennie, second defence; Tom Rennie,
third defence; James `Pat' Feeney, centre; Bill Turnbull, third home; Cliff Spring, second home; Pete Latham, first home; Gordon Spring, outside home; Jack Bryson, inside home

VANCOUVER: Dave Gibbons, goaltender; Jim McConaghy, point; Waldo Matheson, coverpoint; Lionel `Toots' Clarkson, first defence; Weldy Clark, second defence; Ralph
Ravey, third defence; Billy Taylor, centre; George Matheson, third home; William `Spike' Hennessy, second home; Angus `Bones' Allen, first home; Billy O'Brien, outside home;
Edouard `Newsy' Lalonde, inside home

FIRST QUARTER: no scoring
SECOND QUARTER: 1) New Westminster - Cliff Spring 0:30; 2) Vancouver - `Spike' Hennessy 1:30; 3) New Westminster - Pete Latham 3:00; 4) Vancouver - George
Matheson 2:30; 5) Vancouver - `Bones' Allen 7:30
THIRD QUARTER: 6) New Westminster - Tom Rennie 8:30; 7) Vancouver - `Newsy' Lalonde 2:00; 8) New Westminster - Cliff Spring 0:45; 9) Vancouver - `Bones' Allen
2:30; 10) New Westminster - Gordon Spring 1:00
FOURTH QUARTER: 11) New Westminster - Cliff Spring 7:30; 12) New Westminster - Gordon Spring 3:00; 13) New Westminster - Cliff Spring 2:00






1st
2nd
3rd
4th

NEW WESTMINSTER

0
2
3
3

= 8
VANCOUVER


0
3
2
0

= 5



PENALTIES: NEW WESTMINSTER: Charlie Galbraith 10 PIM; Tom Gifford 10 PIM; Bill Turnbull 10 PIM; VANCOUVER: `Newsy' Lalonde 10 PIM

ATTENDANCE: "very poor", "slim attendance"

REFEREE: MJ Barr; JUDGE OF PLAY: Fred J Lynch; GOAL UMPIRES: H Fowler, F Johns, Barlow Galbraith, R Gifford; PENALTY TIMEKEEPERS: HP Kearry, WB
MacDonald; TIMEKEEPERS: J Martin, H Latham

























June 19, 1909 - New Westminster Salmonbellies 9 at Vancouver Lacrosse Club 8

NEW WESTMINSTER: `Sandy' Gray, goaltender; Charlie Galbraith, point; Tom Gifford, coverpoint; Jack Gifford, first defence; George Rennie, second defence; Tom Rennie,
third defence; Bill Turnbull, centre; Irving Wintemute, third home; Cliff Spring, second home; Gordon Spring, first home; Len Turnbull, outside home; Jack Bryson, inside home;
James `Pat' Feeney, substitute

VANCOUVER: Dave Gibbons, goaltender; Jim McConaghy, point; Waldo Matheson, coverpoint; Bob Springer, first defence; Lionel `Toots' Clarkson, second defence; Weldy
Clark, third defence; Ed Longfellow, centre; George Matheson, third home; William `Spike' Hennessy, second home; Angus `Bones' Allen, first home; Billy O'Brien, outside
home; Edouard `Newsy' Lalonde, inside home

FIRST QUARTER: 1) New Westminster - Len Turnbull 2:55; 2.Vancouver - `Spike' Hennessy 1:38; 3) New Westminster - Gordon Spring 3:54; 4) Vancouver - `Bones' Allen
3:14
SECOND QUARTER: 5) New Westminster - Gordon Spring 3:29; 6) New Westminster - Bill Turnbull 7:23; 7) New Westminster - Len Turnbull 3:00; 8) New Westminster -
Gordon Spring 2:02; 9) Vancouver - George Matheson 2:00; 10) Vancouver - George Matheson 1:00
THIRD QUARTER: 11) Vancouver - `Newsy' Lalonde 9:21; 12) Vancouver - `Newsy' Lalonde 1:28; 13) Vancouver - `Toots' Clarkson 3:49
FOURTH QUARTER: 14) New Westminster - Jack Bryson 0:45; 15) New Westminster - Len Turnbull 5:25; 16) New Westminster - Len Turnbull 6:16; 17) Vancouver -
`Newsy' Lalonde 7:24






1st
2nd
3rd
4th

NEW WESTMINSTER

2
4
0
3

= 9
VANCOUVER


2
2
3
1

= 8

PENALTIES: NEW WESTMINSTER: Jack Gifford 10 PIM, 2nd Q; Len Turnbull 5 PIM, 2nd Q; George Rennie 12 PIM, 4th Q; Tom Rennie 5 PIM, 4th Q; VANCOUVER: Billy
O'Brien 10 PIM, 2nd Q; Bob Springer 5 PIM, 3rd Q; `Toots' Clarkson 18 PIM, 4th Q; `Newsy' Lalonde 10 PIM, 4th Q; Billy O'Brien 10 PIM, 4th Q; Billy O'Brien 5 PIM, 4th Q;
Bob Springer 3 PIM, 4th Q

ATTENDANCE: about 5,000

REFEREE: Arthur Wellesley `Wells' Gray (New Westminster); JUDGE OF PLAY: Lionel E Yorke (Vancouver); GOAL UMPIRES: AE Macnaughton (Vancouver), JB Jardine
(New Westminster); PENALTY TIMEKEEPERS: J Martin (Vancouver), HC Major (New Westminster); TIMEKEEPERS: CW Murray (Vancouver), JJ Johnston (New
Westminster)

























June 26, 1909 - MINTO CUP: Toronto Tecumsehs 4 at New Westminster Salmonbellies 6

NEW WESTMINSTER: `Sandy' Gray, goaltender; Charlie Galbraith, point; Tom Gifford, coverpoint; Jack Gifford, first defence; George Rennie, second defence; Tom Rennie,
third defence; Cliff Spring, centre; Irving Wintemute, third home; Gordon Spring, second home; Alex Turnbull, first home; Len Turnbull, outside home; Jack Bryson, inside home

TORONTO: Kinsman, goaltender; Griffiths, point; Fred Graydon, coverpoint; Pickering, first defence; Fred `Mickey' Ion, second defence; Rountree, third defence; Felker, centre;
Green, third home; Querrie, second home; Gilbert, first home; Durkin, outside home; Adamson, inside home

FIRST QUARTER: 1) New Westminster - Alex Turnbull 15:30
SECOND QUARTER: 2) Toronto - Querrie 8:18; 3) New Westminster - Jack Bryson 0:56; 4) Toronto - Gilbert 1:48
THIRD QUARTER: 5) Toronto - Gilbert 3:48; 6) New Westminster - Gordon Spring 3:18; 7) New Westminster - Jack Bryson 3:25; 8) New Westminster - Len Turnbull 2:27; 9)
New Westminster - Tom Rennie 0:57
FOURTH QUARTER: 10) Toronto - Adamson 18:58






1st
2nd
3rd
4th

NEW WESTMINSTER

1
1
4
0

= 6
TORONTO


0
2
1
1

= 4

PENALTIES: NEW WESTMINSTER: Tom Rennie 5 PIM, 3rd Q; TORONTO: Fred Ion 5 PIM, 1st Q; Rountree 5 PIM, 4th Q

REFEREE: Lionel E Yorke (Vancouver); JUDGE OF PLAY: T O'Connell (Montreal); GOAL UMPIRES: Edouard `Newsy' Lalonde (Toronto), William `Spike' Hennessy (New
Westminster); PENALTY TIMEKEEPERS: Bert Jardine (Toronto), HC Major (New Westminster); TIMEKEEPERS: Dr. Taylor (Toronto), JJ Johnston (New Westminster)

























June 29, 1909 - MINTO CUP: Toronto Tecumsehs 5 at New Westminster Salmonbellies 6

NEW WESTMINSTER: `Sandy' Gray, goaltender; Charlie Galbraith, point; Tom Gifford, coverpoint; Jack Gifford, first defence; George Rennie, second defence; Tom Rennie,
third defence; Bill Turnbull, centre; Cliff Spring, third home; Irving Wintemute, second home; Alex Turnbull, first home; Len Turnbull, outside home; Jack Bryson, inside home

TORONTO: Kinsman, goaltender; Griffiths, point; Fred Graydon, coverpoint; Pickering, first defence; Fred `Mickey' Ion, second defence; Rountree, third defence; Felker, centre;
Green, third home; Querrie, second home; Gilbert, first home; Durkin, outside home; Adamson, inside home

FIRST QUARTER: 1) New Westminster - Jack Bryson 3:26; 2) New Westminster - Bill Turnbull 3:26; 3) Toronto - Adamson 6:20
SECOND QUARTER: 4) Toronto - Adamson 8:44; 5) Toronto - Adamson 4:19; 6) New Westminster - Cliff Spring 0:15; 7) Toronto - Querrie 4:10
THIRD QUARTER: 8) New Westminster - Len Turnbull 6:36; 9) New Westminster - Len Turnbull 6:09
FOURTH QUARTER: 10) New Westminster - Len Turnbull 4:30; 11) Toronto - Felker 6:11






1st
2nd
3rd
4th

NEW WESTMINSTER

2
1
2
1

= 6
TORONTO


1
3
0
1

= 5

PENALTIES: NEW WESTMINSTER: Cliff Spring 5 PIM, 1st Q; Bill Turnbull 5 PIM, 2nd Q; Len Turnbull 5 PIM, 2nd Q; TORONTO: Griffiths 5 PIM, 1st Q; Griffiths 5 PIM, 2nd
Q; Pickering 5 PIM, 3rd Q; Felker 5 PIM, 4th Q

REFEREE: Lionel E Yorke (Vancouver); JUDGE OF PLAY: T O'Connell (Montreal); GOAL UMPIRES: Haley Wilson (Ladner), MJ Barr (Vancouver); PENALTY
TIMEKEEPERS: Bert Jardine (Toronto), HC Major (New Westminster); TIMEKEEPERS: Chester Sampson (Vancouver), JJ Johnston (New Westminster)










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