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Sugar Effects

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Tooth decay occurs when bacteria break down sugars and starches in plaque. This forms acid which dissolves the nearby tooth enamel. Much of what children eat causes decay. Sugar is found in cow’s milk, milk-based formulas, and even breast milk, which can cause decay. Apple juice, Sunny Delight and other fruit drinks are high in sugars which produce acids that erode tooth enamel. Frequency – Frequent snacking on foods high in sugar and starches increases the amount of time the teeth are exposed to the dissolving effects of various acids. The frequency of snacking is more important than the amount of the snack. The most common source of sugar is found in soft drinks and juice drinks. Twelve ounces of Coke contains 20 teaspoons of sugar; twelve ounces of many fruit drinks contain 1/4 cup of sugar. Form – Sticky foods are retained on the teeth and allow a longer time for acid production. High in sugar, sticky foods include peanut butter, fruit snacks, chewing gum, raisins, other dried fruits and many candies. Even starchy foods such as cereals, breads, crackers, pretzels and potato chips may linger in the mouth longer than some sweet foods. Just remember, foods that dissolve/melt are better choices than foods that stick!
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Sugar Effects


How Does Sugar Effect Dental Health?

Tooth decay occurs when bacteria break down sugars and starches in plaque. This forms acid
which dissolves the nearby tooth enamel. Much of what children eat causes decay. Sugar is
found in cow’s milk, milk-based formulas, and even breast milk, which can cause decay. Apple
juice, Sunny Delight and other fruit drinks are high in sugars which produce acids that erode
tooth enamel.

Frequency – Frequent snacking on foods high in sugar and starches increases the amount of
time the teeth are exposed to the dissolving effects of various acids. The frequency of snacking
is more important than the amount of the snack. The most common source of sugar is found in
soft drinks and juice drinks. Twelve ounces of Coke contains 20 teaspoons of sugar; twelve
ounces of many fruit drinks contain 1/4 cup of sugar.

Form – Sticky foods are retained on the teeth and allow a longer time for acid production. High
in sugar, sticky foods include peanut butter, fruit snacks, chewing gum, raisins, other dried
fruits and many candies. Even starchy foods such as cereals, breads, crackers, pretzels and
potato chips may linger in the mouth longer than some sweet foods. Just remember, foods that
dissolve/melt are better choices than foods that stick!

To Achieve and Maintain Optimal Dental Health:

o Brush twice a day and (ideally) floss once a day to remove dental plaque. Use a pea-
sized amount of toothpaste containing fluoride. Parents should assist children under
age 8 with brushing and flossing. Once a child learns how to write cursive, the hand
skills needed to be a good brusher are developed.

o Infant gums should be wiped with a damp washcloth or tooth towel after each feeding.

o Do not allow infants to sleep with bottles containing sweetened liquids, fruit juices, milk
or formula. Only use water for naps and night-time.

o Eat a balanced diet including fruits and vegetables, protein and dairy products.

o Minimize the number of between-meal snacks eaten each day, and limit sweets and
juices to mealtimes.

o Bottled water is okay for adults, but kids should have at least 8 oz. of tap water a day to
obtain an adequate amount of fluoride.

o Sugarless chewing gum can help eliminate food particles caught between teeth after a
meal and also helps prevent plaque build-up by stimulating saliva production.

o Visit your dentist every 6 months to keep you teeth and gums healthy.




Sugar in Liquid Foods

Regular soft drinks provide youth and young adults with significant amounts of sugar
and calories. Both regular and diet sodas affect American’s intake of various vitamins
and minerals.

FOOD ITEM

PORTION

TSPS OF SUGAR

Beverages:
Coke, Dr. Pepper.…
1 can/12oz….
10 tsp or 40g
Mountain Dew….
8oz….
7 tsp
Sprite….
8oz….
6 ½ tsp
Sunkist Orange….
8oz….
8 ¾ tsp
Sweet Tea….
8oz….
4 ½ tsp
(Instant sweetened with sugar)

1 Teaspoon Sugar = approximately 4 grams
12 Teaspoons = ¼ cup


What to Drink Instead of Soft Drinks….
o Water
o Orange, grapefruit, white grape and other diluted juices
o Milk
o Crystal Light

The Sweet Facts

Most parents are confident that their children are eating very few sweets. But sugar is
hard to avoid. Some percentage is found in almost everything we eat.

Commercial breakfast cereals in particular contain a large amount of sucrose and
glucose. Sucrose is a sugar refined from sugar cane and beets. The glucose is sweet
syrup drawn from fruit starches. Both of these are prevalent to some extent in all
breakfast cereals.

But sugars are also found in many other foods children enjoy. If you are not sure about
the sugar content of a product, read the label. Ingredients are listed relative to the
amount in the product. Therefore, if sugar is listed first, there is more of it than any
other ingredient.


Dietary Control of Dental Decay

The following are examples of food containing large quantities of sugar. This is NOT a
complete list, so when food shopping please be label conscious. Learn to read labels to
know the sugar content of each serving, look for the words “high-fructose corn syrup”
or sugar per serving in that food. When shopping for snacks, remember that raw fruits
and vegetables are the best choices. When that isn't possible, substitute with an
artificially-sweetened snack.
Try to avoid…
Apple and other fruit
Jams and jellies
Fruit Roll-ups/Fruit
juices
Sugar coated cereals
snacks
Soft Drinks
Donuts and pastries
Raisins/dried fruits
Chocolate milk
Candy, chewing gum

Good choices…
Nuts (after age 3)
Fresh fruit
Pasta
Popcorn (not sugar
Hard boiled eggs
Cheese
coated)
Bologna, Salami
Bread, Baguette
Sugarless gum, candy,
Low sugar cereals
Fresh Vegetables
drinks
Cooked cereals

Foods best eaten with meals…
Milk drinks, milkshakes
Fruit juices
Desserts-cookies, pies,
Canned fruit
Peanut butter
cakes, pudding
Dried fruit
Potato and Corn chips

Applesauce
Ice cream

Instead of…



Try…

Fruit Juices or fruit drinks
Fruit flavored water without sugar added
Soft drinks
Artificially sweetened varieties
Hi-C or Kool-Aid
Kool-Aid mix with artificial sweeteners
Sweet tea & other sweetened drinks
Crystal Light
Donut or Pop Tart
Toast or bagel without jelly
Cookies
Fruit, lower sugar varieties-graham crackers
Candy (sticky)
Nuts, popcorn (not sugar coated), crackers,

cheese, ice cream, popsicles, pudding and juice
Fruit Roll-ups or dried fruits
Fresh fruit and vegetables
High sugar cereal
Oatmeal and other cooked cereals











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